Profile

Xiang Ji profile image

Xiang Ji

Student

  • 10 reviews
  • 5 completed
Content 
Instructor 
Provider 
University of Washington's CS courses are true class, and prof Grossman while already being erudite on the subject conveyed the core ideas excellently with his clear instructions. This is true university course experience instead of a watered down so-called "course" created just for getting people pass the course easily and pay for a "certificate", which unfortunately are abundant out there. Knowledge on programming languages is really crucial. No matter whether you're a CS student, a programmer or a researcher, this course would be highly recommended.
Content 
Instructor 
Provider 
Definitely listen to the original lectures on OpenYale instead of ones on Coursera, if you have time! The course itself is quite brilliant. However it's a pity that they had to cut the lecture material down to less than half of its original length. A lot of context was definitely lost. If you got time, watch the original lecture on OpenYale, which were nearly 30 hours in length. You can always do the quizzes and assignments just in the same manner, but the abridged lectures on Coursera will actually potentially leave you confused.
Content 
Instructor 
Provider 
The instructor looks like a serious old fella. He just basically read from the PPTs he has written. So it's actually perfectly OK to look at the PPTs directly anyways. The content looks more like a series of advice from an experienced startup guy than a coherent lecture series. It's actually decently valuable. Although he might not be your top-notch startup guru(somebody like Peter Thiel, for example), he at least was not talking total nonsense and you could benefit quite a bit from going through the whole course, especially considering similar resources for free are rare. Also, the reading list he gave is generally sound and good.
Content 
Instructor 
Provider 
A pretty good class actually. The lecturer might be a bit old-fashioned but at least he presents the contents methodically and with familiarity. He explains almost evey basic aspect of android applications, including underlying structure, four classes(activity, contentprovider, Broadcastreceiver, Service), UI, async operations, networking, touching, location services etc and have all corresponding labs and quizzes to help you learn them. Having someone experienced to guide you through is definitely much better than dully reading through the official documents and stuff. After the class you should be able to dish out an android application with ease. I don't understand the people complaining. It seems to me many of them don't have the required programming background(it says you have to have at least about sophomore level) and then can't understand the contents and then blame the lecturer. Come on, this is serious programming, not a child's game. Go take some intro to programming before returning and fantasizing about making an app without spending any effort. If you want some "courses" which claim to teach something but in the end just bluffs its way through with seemingly funny but totally contentless stuffs, this is not for you and we're happy to have you leaving anyways. The deadline changess are probably about "signature track", which i doubt has more to do with coursera than the lecturer anyways. Some others complain about the massive reading one has to do besides of the lecture videos to finish the assignments and fashion out a real application. But this is how you learn. Lectures are always just a summary and guide. It can’t replace reading. If you don’t even have this basic notion then you probably shouldn’t be doing CS at all. Bottom line: There’s simply NO course which can MAGICALLY turn you into a competent Android programmer by just lecturing. And this course this already doing great it what it can.
Content 
Instructor 
Provider 
It's kind of similar to a typical undergraduate computer organization course, with slightly more emphasis on a programmer's perspective. Like almost all other online courses, the content is shortened compared to the actual offering in UW, but not very much. It's compact enough and serves as quite a decent course for software programmers as a portal to gain basic understanding on computer structures. Assignments are challenging and you'll have to do some extra readings to tackle them, but they are also generally fun and rewarding. The reference textbook used, Computer Systems: A Programmer's Perspective is particularly of high quality.
Content 
Instructor 
Provider 
I quite wish coursetalk would enable a "comment" function so people would be able to discuss others' reviews. I'm not sure if Gerard O'Neill was trolling or not when he posted his one-star review. After reading through his original post on Tumblr I decided that he was in a large part just trying to get some attention(subconsciously or not) with an article filled with childish wordings (like "a slap in the face" and "firing" etc.) and incompetent reasonings(He is only 21 according to his personal information, after all). The only caveat: If you're a beginner then don't complain if you find the course too hard, just like don't complain if SICP is too hard to follow. Otherwise this is definitely a generally rewarding class.
Content 
Instructor 
Provider 
Just want to post here to point out how absurd the bottom (1-star) review is. In case you don't know, for over 20 years MIT (as well as Berkeley, and several other universities, if I'm not mistaken) has been using Lisp as the language to use for introduction to programming, only to change to Python about 5 years ago. The book Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs(SICP) is like a bible. Learning OOP straight away is totally misleading and dangerous for new programmers. Therefore I'm glad to see there's such a course out there to introduce people to the world of programming by simplified Lisp. Those who don't understand the good part of it, probably don't have the qualities to become a good programmer either. So stop posting ignorant and foolish "reviews" won't they if they don't understand a thing. Totally ridiculous.
Content 
Instructor 
Provider 
Compared with Programming Languages offered by the University of Washington, I'd say the lectures could have been longer: I had to do some extra reading /forum searching to finish the assignments. Still, it's a quite decent introduction to functional programming, especially as its workload is significantly lower than the above-mentioned course(still takes half a day to finish at least, mind you), and therefore more reasonable for people who have other commitments in life. Another benefit is it teaches in Scala, which, as of my knowledge, is rarely covered in real undergraduate courses. That is to say, if I want to take a Programming Languages course I can still do it in my school, but Scala, no.
Content 
Instructor 
Provider 
This course is fantastic, and I don't really think "a lack of online format transition" a problem at all. Many many other courses have been delivered in the form of a whole chunk before as well, such as courses on MIT open courseware and the previous "Justice" series, and they are still pretty amazing if you really can sedate yourself for just an hour and listen hard. Not to mention that in this course, except for the length of the course, every other thing that should be here is here, such as in-video questions, transcripts, online gradebooks, discussion forums and stuffs and stuffs. Sometimes I really wonder whether those pieces of videos in just over ten minutes can go into much depth, an example being Khan Academy's Linear Algebra, which I took and completed. The course content is of course amazingly enthralling as this is one of the best courses in Harvard. Actually getting to see how the whole class interacts is a benefit itself as there's much to learn. Just from seeing the whole class and listening to the teacher talk you can feel that "wow this is indeed Harvard"! Sometimes I just can't help laughing out load and I'm sure that all the time I'm indeed learning something. You can hardly ask for more. And IMO in which language it is delivered doesn't matter at all. It's the words of wisdom from the instructors, the stimulation from the intellectual atmosphere, and the comprehensive, reasonable course structure for an introductory CS course that matters the most!
Content 
Instructor 
Provider 
This is quite a curious case of online course. It's totally unconventional, it's one of the worst and also one of the best. But after all it's definitely worth taking, provided it's offered again. Let me explain why, starting from cons: Cons: The course isn't really well organized. Lecture videos always arrive after their promised release time. What's more unbelievable is the other promised lecturer didn't show up at all. In the end the amount of people who did the final project(which doesn't affect the completion of the course) was shoddy. Pros: Regardless of the video lecture quality, all the resources provided by the lecturer as a seasoned Silicon Valley insider is top-notch. After going through all the readings + course notes you'll have a much much better and more systematic idea of what a startup is about, and, without exaggeration, much deeper insight on the whole world. To gain invaluable insight, experience and information in an organized form from a seasoned and quite successful startup guy is wonderful and will help you form correct notions about many things in the beginning, helping you save unnecessary wasted time. Also the skills he taught are quite useful as well. The cons are probably because the lecturer was just too busy. After all he is not a pure professor, but also the boss of a startup company. So I actually doubt whether this course will get offered again. But for all the resources it's definitely worthy to do.