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Ilya Rudyak

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  • 6 reviews
  • 5 completed
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In fact there are only two good books on automata out there: Introduction to the Theory of Computation by Michael Sipser and the recommended one. So you don't have a lot of options. In the first one all topics are covered and mathematical language is less complicated. It's very well known as very clear and concise text. There are also a couple of good video courses on youtube - especially from Arsdigita. The last one is brilliant. In fact - this is a standard. There are also videos of Henry Lewis from Harvard on iTunes U - and they are much more complete (3-4 month course). So what you get from this course? 1) the emphasis is on grammars and regex, other topics especially TM and complexity are covered in less details; 2) HW is tough and interesting but it's not enough for getting comfortable with main concepts 3) no serious theorems and proofs. In short - 6 weeks is not enough to cover his book AND get a solid understanding of automata. If you really want to understand the subject from this point of view you should read his book. This will give you result but is it what you really need? EDIT: in last offering you'll also get some programming exercises and a LOT of challenging problems with explanations. some of them are really hard.
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This course is truly brilliant. What do I mean by that? There is no one algo course to fit everybody: 1) Essence of this course is in crystal clear explanation of the material. It's especially good for people with conceptual and birds-eye way of thinking. Problem sets are doable but you'll get challenge problems (not graded) that sometimes are really hard. 2) It's not a math class (like CLRS and MIT course), it's rather use this approach from UCB textbook (p. 9): "Playing on the strengths of our students , instead of dwelling on formal proofs we distilled in each case the crisp mathematical idea that makes the algorithm work". 3) It's also not a programming class - go to Princeton course. There is a programming assignment on every week but it's by far not enough to understand proper implementation of an algo.
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Overall this is one of the best courses on android development. But it's hard - so you better be prepared both to work and search for better approach to this course. Here are some details: * this course is mainly about networking and storage (especially content providers and loaders); but also includes some info about services and notifications; as well as some basic UI stuff including big screens and mock-ups; * it's not an easy course and I'd suggest you read some books beforehand (some suggestions mentioned below); * this course is build around an app development (a weather app) as many other android courses; probably this course is close to Yamba app from "Learning android" or RSS reader from Murach book. * recommendations and code are close to those you can find on official android site or in Reto's book; * this course is not ideal (put it mildly) from pedagogical point of view (especially the core parts) but you have really great Github repository with multiple branches so you always can find you way through it; and don't forget to read books and developers site (it's great);
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Well - I am not able to read lectures (see other reviews). But exercises are very good. There are a lot of useful tools. I consider this course as a way to get comfortable with Boolean algebra. You may find it useful to use it in computer systems design or some other areas. This is kind of unique course - you don't find a lot of courses on math logic out there. And this is traditional course for Stanford - I don't know why. By no means however this is like Kleene standard course.
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This course will teach you some fundamentals of programming like OOP and recursion and some more sophisticated things like generators. But it's only first part of the course. The second part is about applications to engineering - Monte-Carlo etc. and data-structures like trees. You'll get carefully crafted projects for some real-life problems for example in genetics and robotics. There is a good book bu John Guttag. I also recommend to watch his lectures on YouTube. It's rather difficult course and I'd say MIT quintessential.
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Best of the best! You'll get fully filmed lectures of brilliant David Malan and set of really entertaining projects. And much more - shorts, 2 tracks of recitations, seminars, notes of lectures, useful link to web-resources and a final projects. You'll also get a lot of fun starting from binary search show using yellow pages. This course is half about C and half about web-development (PHP, MySQL). And this is a unique mix you can't find in some other places. And it was really useful for me to study C - it's absolutely necessary to fully understand modern languages.