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Justine Ivan

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  • 15 reviews
  • 9 completed
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There are no weekly graded quizzes or assignments. BUT there are a lot of exercises you can do and are important for appercepting the contents of the course. The notations & math and philosophy combined is very intriguing for me, the reason why I enrolled. It is not easy to understand. A lot of reading, thinking (long pauses and blank stares) and exercises (doodling) is needed to really get the feel and depth of the course. There will soon be a graded final exam. Hannes and Stephan said that we shouldn't worry about it as it would be easy and not very important as the goal of their course is to get people excited about mathematical philosophy. We'll see. \---update--- The final exam was really not much of a pain but requires enough familiarity from the lessons presented throughout the course. The MOOC is a great introduction to Mathematical Philosophy. I am not sure how to better approach the learning of the topic but the length of the videos per week is somewhat in the excess and I thought the practice part of the learning of this topic is vital and the lack of a better structure/guidance in doing it is a negative mark for the course.
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This is a very interesting subject. Although the topics are too broad and fast. Really fast. The equations were not thoroughly discussed, Hitoshi would even say that we shouldn't mind it much. BUT come homework(2), you need all the power! ha. There were also Optional Challenge for the smart people in the crowd(-me). A lot is being said in every lecture, probably to entice the student to explore further. \----update---- It is done. I wasn't able to finish it. An additional negative/positive note/review maybe unfair.
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This is a highly produced course. The activities are well in order for you to really take part. I've only took part on the first two weeks and it became too time consuming for me. And you wouldn't want to miss any activity 1\. Because I want full participation of the course. 2\. because you won't be able to answer some of the quiz question If I had more time in my hands, and a bigger motivation. I would take this again. I've always wanted to really really understand Climate Change. Oh yeah, I hate it that part of the grade is the number of posts in the discussion forums. It is a double-edge sword. You get extra-discussion (you push people to speak out) but you also get the non- sense/empty talk. And the latter is dominant, sadly.
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So you want to know how to code? This is the best start anyone can take. I am 40% complete at the time of this writing. I don't find it easy. It is the straight-forward hands-on learning anyone needs to learn this shit.
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This was my first coding experience and it was very cool because you see the product of you labor. I even called my lil' bro and showed him the game I made (partially) because a huge portion of the code is provided. It was probably made to be accessible to newbies, and most say that is quite easy but for me, this is hard. I've spent a huge amount of time working. What I dislike is I still don't know very much after all of it. haha. (maybe that one is on me)
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So far this MOOC has been great. It is well produced. The audience, everyone, is very well taken into consideration. The workload per week will really depend on the level of participation and the 'gaming' you would do as part of the assignment/analysis but I wouldn't call that "workload". I don't see signs of quizzes anywhere. This is one MOOC where the participants are very active in the forums and you can really get quality interactions. I've chosen 4/5 rating based on the first week only and the "medium" difficulty as a neutral choice for the meantime. I thought this MOOC is best for parents and educators to help them understand gaming and make use of it as a mean of education rather than being completely against it all the time.
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My introduction to BigData. It was pleasant. Mostly basic definitions with great real-life examples to partner it. The best part of the course is the 'further study/reading' provided for a better grasp of the whatever is presented every module. This is a REAL introduction. I guess it is targeted at high school students to let them get a taste and maybe they'll pursue the career related to it. These track options are provided by the platform.
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The connections you will make and the projects are the core of the course. Not the video lectures. The instruction was relatively simple and it was made to be so. The creative guidance was minimal sometimes it made me let loose and be successful and sometimes -- dead-end. I am not sure if I put the blame on the course or on me. I tend to go with the latter. Checking out and grading the projects of the other groups was a good fun too.
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Scott is pretty messy with this one. Blink and you'll see the screen/slide full of doodles. haha. That is what I hate about it. But the instruction/explanation was clear and the cases are intuitive. (smoking). The statistics used can be forgotten easily if you don't practice and write is down. There was one week that I just went straight to the quiz after the lectures without the self-explanation/brain storming of the lecture and I end up almost zeroing the test. Good thing there is a second attempt and I took it slowly. There were exercises before the graded quiz and to be frank the ungraded exercises are harder than the quiz. The quizzes are relatively simple, which is ok because what is important, I guess, is you understand the concept, over sorting the data on paper! (I hate that part too.) Good overall. Could be better. More finesse and some video editing wouldn't hurt.
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Self-paced. Perfect! For an introductory course, self-paced probably is the best. You don't want to shy away interested folks because of the speed or bore the fast-learners (or who already know what is what). Slowly, you get to the core of the coding in Python and you will definitely need to know what you are doing before moving on the the next stages, which I value very much.
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This one is tough, men. I've taken a similar course at my college and boy, I don't remember anything from it. It only looked familiar to me but I can't solve a goddamn thing. Made me realize that my college credit was a dead giveaway. It requires a lot of time from anyone. Just the lectures are a lot (it is taken from a real MIT class). [Hours dude, hours] The instruction was great, I have no qualms on it. My failure is most definitely because of the weakness of my prerequisites. And my slow-paced learning capability. This should have been an awesome complement for my engineering degree. I will definitely go watch the videos and do the exercises in the future (if it is still available) and after my integral calculus, diff. equation, classical mechanics, dynamics, etc. are well in order.
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I love my logic course in college. It was lively, intuitive and fun. This course is the complete opposite. Before starting, I really felt that I would love the experience but week after week I was drained of energy from boredom and dullness til' I eventually crashed. The first course I un-enrolled in coursera. I audit a lot of the courses and take tests self-paced but not really dropping it. This one --- very disheartening. But I might take it again. (I am pretty stubborn) Maybe I just not used to the notations. Maybe.
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You will use a lot of tools for the course. Which is the best part of it. It is hands on. Most of the projects/assignment are peer reviewed which could get irritating if you take it seriously. haha. Because you've work hours and the grading was not that strict but the peer-graders can sometimes be fuckups. But that fault is still a fault of all these MOOCs. That is why someone who can create a better mode of testing is very welcome. You will need Balsamiq and Axure/Justinmind for the assignments. I was only able to submit my Balsamiq prototypes and not for my Axure, because it was too steep of a learning curve for me and the submission deadline was too soon for me. Nevertheless, the things I was able to learn was up there. I even start to critique sites for their bad typography and placements of buttons & frames, and the ambiguous instructions,etc. Haha. You can directly apply this if you are a web designer. I am not one though.
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I've worked long hours trying to understand the concepts and solving the problem sets for this course. Very fulfilling. (Though I missed the deadline twice). Randles, teaches slowly which I like and is probably the BEST instructor for me. The clarity can't be beaten! I love the whiteboard and pen (or chalk & board [what do you call these?]) style over the slides/powerpoint style. We even have a week 0 to motivate the learners and give tips in math and studying overall. What I got from 'week 0' is already a good take-out from the course. Great quality instruction and experience. I would definitely take another course from Sir Lagerstrom. Whatever the subject is.
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Bart and Jim are awesome dudes! You can feel the intention to teach in every video lecture. I hate math. I hate calculus. I am taking this because it is a prerequisite of a lot of stuff that I am interested in and my degree. Their slow-paced, positive, and energetic approach is just right for me. Sometimes the amount of minutes and activities and readings are a bit much for me, but I guess mastering any math warrants it.