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Homer Thompson profile image
Homer Thompson profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 9 reviews
  • 7 completed
5 years, 5 months ago
I said this in my review of Part II, but it applies equally well to Part I: For anyone who loves programming, this is a truly memorable course taught by one of the great heavyweights in the field. It's reall... I said this in my review of Part II, but it applies equally well to Part I: For anyone who loves programming, this is a truly memorable course taught by one of the great heavyweights in the field. It's really something to see that such an important researcher as Sedgewick is also a phenomenal teacher. It's beautiful the way he shows the algorithms operating. Most powerpoint/pdf lectures are just frankly wastes of time to me, but Sedgewick animates his algorithms slowly and without skipping steps on his slides so that you really see how the algorithms work. It can be so hard to look at a piece of code and decipher exactly what the process is that's being executed, but the animations really help to clarify. Part I is a really awesome survey of sorting algorithms and search data structures. I loved the way Sedgewick taught how to do real, industrial-strength implementations of quicksort, for instance. I loved the discussion of the Dutch National Flag problem for partitioning. These kind of critical details are very often left out of algorithms courses where you are usually presented with a simpler quicksort that doesn't perform nearly as well. Another highlight was the bouncing balls in a container simulation (could have just as well been gas molecules in a box) using priority queues. I mean what a cool application that would be impossible to run without such an efficient data structure. The percolation project was pretty difficult, but also really interesting. Sedgewick gives such a clear discussion of union-find. My favorite project though was the one on K-d trees, which are extremely important in 3D graphics. It was by far the hardest project in either Algorithms I or II, but so satisfying once you get it up and running and meeting all performance deadlines. The only complaint I have about the course is the left leaning red-black trees. While the code is really really short for them, it's also much more clever and difficult to follow than the more straightforward CLRS implementation, and it also doesn't perform as well (which is why you see CLRS style red-black trees in the C++ STL, for instance, rather than Sedgewick's left leaning red black trees). Don't get me wrong: the left leaning red-black tree data structure is pretty cool, but I think it would be better taught as a modification of the classic RB trees. To close this review, this comment I made in the review for Part II applies equally well to Part I: Professor Kevin Wayne was EXTREMELY active on the forums. I can't count how many times I'd have a question about something and Professor Wayne would weigh in within a couple of hours to answer me. I don't know how he has the energy, but we'd be fools to not take advantage!
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Prashant Singh profile image
Prashant Singh profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 3 reviews
  • 1 completed
2 years, 4 months ago
-You will learn algorithms -Programming assignments are in Java -Prof. Robert always gives the basic idea behind the Algorithm and explains the java code very easily. -Short video lectures are good. -You... -You will learn algorithms -Programming assignments are in Java -Prof. Robert always gives the basic idea behind the Algorithm and explains the java code very easily. -Short video lectures are good. -You will get to implement all the data structures like min heap etc...
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