E-learning and Digital Cultures

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8/10 stars
based on  14 reviews
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Cost FREE
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Course Details

Cost

FREE

Upcoming Schedule

  • TBA

Course Provider

Coursera online courses
Coursera's online classes are designed to help students achieve mastery over course material. Some of the best professors in the world - like neurobiology professor and author Peggy Mason from the University of Chicago, and computer science professor and Folding@Home director Vijay Pande - will supplement your knowledge through video lectures. They will also provide challenging assessments, interactive exercises during each lesson, and the opportunity to use a mobile app to keep up with yo...
Coursera's online classes are designed to help students achieve mastery over course material. Some of the best professors in the world - like neurobiology professor and author Peggy Mason from the University of Chicago, and computer science professor and Folding@Home director Vijay Pande - will supplement your knowledge through video lectures. They will also provide challenging assessments, interactive exercises during each lesson, and the opportunity to use a mobile app to keep up with your coursework. Coursera also partners with the US State Department to create “learning hubs” around the world. Students can get internet access, take courses, and participate in weekly in-person study groups to make learning even more collaborative. Begin your journey into the mysteries of the human brain by taking courses in neuroscience. Learn how to navigate the data infrastructures that multinational corporations use when you discover the world of data analysis. Follow one of Coursera’s “Skill Tracks”. Or try any one of its more than 560 available courses to help you achieve your academic and professional goals.

Provider Subject Specialization
Humanities
Sciences & Technology
4724 reviews

Course Description

This course will explore how digital cultures and learning cultures connect, and what this means for the ways in which we conduct education online. The course is not about how to ‘do’ e-learning; rather, it is an invitation to view online educational practices through a particular lens – that of popular and digital culture. Follow this course on Twitter at #edcmooc.
Reviews 8/10 stars
14 Reviews for E-learning and Digital Cultures

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Rankings are based on a provider's overall CourseTalk score, which takes into account both average rating and number of ratings. Stars round to the nearest half.

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Emily Purser profile image
Emily Purser profile image
9/10 starsCompleted
  • 1 review
  • 1 completed
6 years, 8 months ago
I was impressed by the daring of the course team to be both a bit experimental and extra-ordinarily open, through their blogging and interactions with many participants, about their thinking during the process. Their suggestion, a month before the course began, that participants start networking via various social media was taken up with alacrity by hundreds, and then a few thousand, and it is the G+, FB, Twitter and other conversational spaces that drove the course and made it - for those who participated (!) - one of the most fabulous learning experiences ever had online. Testament to the level of engagement this course has stimulated (which participants report they have not experienced in other online courses they've done) is the fact that these conversations are still going, well after the course has ended, and seem set to continue well into the future. I've not personally ever experienced such an open, welcoming and delightful c... I was impressed by the daring of the course team to be both a bit experimental and extra-ordinarily open, through their blogging and interactions with many participants, about their thinking during the process. Their suggestion, a month before the course began, that participants start networking via various social media was taken up with alacrity by hundreds, and then a few thousand, and it is the G+, FB, Twitter and other conversational spaces that drove the course and made it - for those who participated (!) - one of the most fabulous learning experiences ever had online. Testament to the level of engagement this course has stimulated (which participants report they have not experienced in other online courses they've done) is the fact that these conversations are still going, well after the course has ended, and seem set to continue well into the future. I've not personally ever experienced such an open, welcoming and delightful community of fellows, online or offline, and am enormously grateful to the course team for stimulating our discussions with rather well chosen texts and interesting questions to consider. I found the teachers' presence very real and significant, and appreciated it greatly throughout, along with the exceptional level of contribution by those who chose to engage and keep engaged. I heartily recommend the course, because through it I have found myself part of some genuinely intelligent discussions of far more than the 'texts' (which were good conversations starters) - conversations about pedagogy, educational technology, digital literacy and the role of dialogue and multi-modal representation in learning... and the sharing of resources to maintain ongoing conversation and learning continues beyond the course unabated - brilliant. My criticisms focus on the coursera discussion forums and the mode of assessment (not the task itself - that was great)... I found the 'official' forum pretty chaotic and unpleasant to use - its main value to me was as a point of comparison with other forms of online interaction, which I was thereby able to recognise as infinitely superior in every way, and as a result am now encouraging my students to move their discussions out of the institutional LMS and into more multi-modal social media... I note also that those in EDC mooc who have now joined other moocs are preferring to create multi-modal social networking spaces rather than use the official forums... says a lot. Re assessment - there has been a lot of discontent with the peer reviewing, because peer assessment only works when peers are competent to evaluate, which many in a mooc evidently are not (because they haven't done it before)... so instruction needs to be improved. Otherwise, the very open and free and socially networked flavour of the course was experienced by many as its greatest characteristic. My initial and abiding impression is that the teaching team are paying very close attention to feedback, and putting their and the participants' experiences at the centre of their research, so I expect the course will only continue to improve in its design, resourcing, delivery and modes of interaction and assessment. In any case, I highly recommend it, as is or as it will become, to anyone interested in the role and use of multimodal representation and networked communications in higher education. Whether it's easy or moderately hard depends on prior experience and willingness to engage with other participants. As it happened (typical of online courses at this stage in the mooc phenomenon's development) most fully engaged participants are using the course as professional development, and an opportunity to see education from the learner perspective for a change, as they're mostly educators (predictably, in a course on the topic of online education). Other participants I'm still in conversation with are all finding immediate practical application for tools and discourse shared through this course, and have formed something of a fan club for the course and its facilitators... we consider the course a gift and a gem, and are very grateful for the experience.
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Maryna Lagereva profile image
Maryna Lagereva profile image
8/10 starsCompleted
  • 7 reviews
  • 6 completed
2 years, 8 months ago
The course offered a very intresting perspective for analyzing e-learning and digital cultures, however, I disliked the fact that actually there were no lectures. The following opitions were offered: 1) short videos, ads, etc; 2) articles and speeches to read. There was only one assignment at the end of the course - to make a "digictal artifact". In other words, the course was good at provoking various thoughts and ideas about advantages and disadvantages of the e-learning, but it didn't teach me anything.
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Jodi Millard profile image
Jodi Millard profile image
8/10 starsCompleted
  • 5 reviews
  • 3 completed
5 years, 4 months ago
This course does an excellent job of creating a strong and engaged community. Discussion and sharing of information play major roles, and the focus is less on assignments and quizzes.  There is only one project to complete for the certificate.
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Mathieu Plourde profile image
Mathieu Plourde profile image
9/10 starsTaking Now
  • 1 review
  • 0 completed
5 years, 11 months ago
I liked the format of this course. The intro videos are well connected with the course content and provide a better understanding of their host institutions and of the instructors. The curated videos and resources were very interesting and helpful. This course makes strong connections between philosophy, popular culture, technology, and learning, which is great since most people I talk to are not educational technologists, but faculty members. The weekly Hangouts on Air added a very nice touch to the course, providing the kind of discussions academics have among one another. I also felt that the instructors were responsive in reading and commenting on student work. I like the fact that there were no quizzes and deadlines and such, just a capstone digital artifact to produce. I have enough going on in my life without having to deal with the extra pressure of completing MOOC quizzes in time. "You get what you give" in this course.
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Student profile image
Student profile image

Student

9/10 starsTaking Now
5 years, 11 months ago
I am a university professor looking for ways to experiment with technology in the classroom and to improve my teaching. "E-Learning and Digital Cultures," one of two MOOCS I am currently taking, has allowed me to achieve both goals. My specific interest is in developing and teaching classes in art-making using MOOC or flipped class platforms. There are very few MOOC offerings in the arts (sadly) and I recognize the potential that MOOC platforms allow, especially for high school and college students that are unable to take fine and performing arts classes because those areas have been eliminated from the curriculum. "E-Learning and Digital Cultures" is a self-paced course that requires students to have a great deal of patience and discipline.It is taught as if it was a class being offered in a graduate program. Each week's subject is approached in a multimodal and interdisciplinary manner. The topics are weighty and multifaceted. The ... I am a university professor looking for ways to experiment with technology in the classroom and to improve my teaching. "E-Learning and Digital Cultures," one of two MOOCS I am currently taking, has allowed me to achieve both goals. My specific interest is in developing and teaching classes in art-making using MOOC or flipped class platforms. There are very few MOOC offerings in the arts (sadly) and I recognize the potential that MOOC platforms allow, especially for high school and college students that are unable to take fine and performing arts classes because those areas have been eliminated from the curriculum. "E-Learning and Digital Cultures" is a self-paced course that requires students to have a great deal of patience and discipline.It is taught as if it was a class being offered in a graduate program. Each week's subject is approached in a multimodal and interdisciplinary manner. The topics are weighty and multifaceted. The seriousness of the subject matter require students to develop an independent frame of mind about online education and the other topics under investigation (such as utopic or dystopic views of man/machine relations). In short, the course assumes that students are comfortable with conceptual thinking, reviewing theoretical texts and managing their time effectively. On the upside, I loved the different positions offered by members of the teaching team, and together, they seemed to care a great deal about what students thought and felt. The weekly "Google Hangouts" were lively and a joy to watch. Each teacher seem very dedicated to the subject of technology and education and passionate about further developing the MOOC format. I am also very impressed with peer-to-peer interaction, made available via the discussion forums and reviews of assignments. On the downside, the theoretical underpinnings of the class can sometimes be frustrating to navigate. Again, there are assumptions about the level of education of students and their comfort wading through dense material (the academic articles, particularly). Many questions are raised in the course, but few, if any, are answered, even by the instructors. In sum, if you are exited by open- ended instruction that is primarily self-guided, taking this MOOC will be a very meaningful experience.
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Lisa Fletcher profile image
Lisa Fletcher profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 3 reviews
  • 3 completed
6 years, 2 months ago
I have been interested in digital culture and e-learning for a long time, and when I saw this course offered was quick to sign up. It was different to what I expected, quite theoretical in the course content (I was expecting more practical content about how to create e-learning platforms etc) but it really stretched my way of thinking about things. I enjoyed the weekly curated videos and reading content, which were a really refreshing change from the usual lecture-style videos. My favorite aspect of the course was that we could create photos/videos/digital stories for the assignments. I took photos and created a mash-up in Mozilla's Popcorn Maker - way more satisfying than a quiz or written assignment (for me anyway!). Another great aspect of the course was how active the participants were on Twitter and other social media. It made me feel like I really was in an enormous virtual classroom with students from around the world.
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Greta profile image
Greta profile image
1/10 starsDropped
  • 8 reviews
  • 6 completed
6 years, 8 months ago
Well, if you've attended other online courses - this one is not like them. I wouldn't even call it a course, because there are no lectures at all. There is some material (mostly videos) that you are asked to watch and reflect on and that's about it. Though the provided material is divided into separate weeks nothing hinders you from watching everything at day one. The linked videos were certainly interesting and thought provoking but the whole format of the course was so fuzzy and diffuse that I didn't feel enriched by the experience. The instructors called the format a "student-centered … approach" - I'd call it unguided self-study. Which raised a question in my mind: for such a course - what do I need instructors or an online course platform for? The instructors didn't teach or guide, the platform was just used as a link collection and the discussion took mainly place on various social media platforms. To sum it up I'd like to quot... Well, if you've attended other online courses - this one is not like them. I wouldn't even call it a course, because there are no lectures at all. There is some material (mostly videos) that you are asked to watch and reflect on and that's about it. Though the provided material is divided into separate weeks nothing hinders you from watching everything at day one. The linked videos were certainly interesting and thought provoking but the whole format of the course was so fuzzy and diffuse that I didn't feel enriched by the experience. The instructors called the format a "student-centered … approach" - I'd call it unguided self-study. Which raised a question in my mind: for such a course - what do I need instructors or an online course platform for? The instructors didn't teach or guide, the platform was just used as a link collection and the discussion took mainly place on various social media platforms. To sum it up I'd like to quote one of the students on the forums: "This course [made] me feel like a lab rat." It obviously was an experiment, frankly for me it didn't work.
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Wilko Dijkhuis profile image
Wilko Dijkhuis profile image
1/10 starsDropped
  • 4 reviews
  • 3 completed
6 years, 9 months ago
You probably heard stories about artists that bought a can of sardines, smuggled it into a museum and placed it on a pedestal. Next day visitors look at the sardine can, use their art appreciation skills to interpret it, go home and tell their friends about the wonderful transformative experience they had. This course basically is such a can of sardines. Somehow the authors smuggled it onto the Coursera site. A very nice course for those who want to practice art appreciation skills or blog about deep transformative experiences.
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Rick Bartlett profile image
Rick Bartlett profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 1 review
  • 1 completed
6 years, 8 months ago
This course was my first MOOC. I found it extremely engaging as an adult learner. I signed up for the class for professional development, to learn about digital learning tools, and to create a personal learning network (PLN). All of those goals and more were met through this course. I found the constructivist methodology extremely life-giving to me. The level of engagement from other students through the forums that were suggested by the instructors (FB, G+, Twitter) was beyond my expectations. I was able to connect with other students and to build relationships. I did find the volume of postings and comments to be overwhelming, especially at first, but I learned to filter the information by focusing on smaller groups. The final assignment, creation of a digital artifact, was a perfect conclusion for me. I didn't want to take a test, or quiz, I wanted to learn digital tools, creating the digital artifact gave me the challenge and tas... This course was my first MOOC. I found it extremely engaging as an adult learner. I signed up for the class for professional development, to learn about digital learning tools, and to create a personal learning network (PLN). All of those goals and more were met through this course. I found the constructivist methodology extremely life-giving to me. The level of engagement from other students through the forums that were suggested by the instructors (FB, G+, Twitter) was beyond my expectations. I was able to connect with other students and to build relationships. I did find the volume of postings and comments to be overwhelming, especially at first, but I learned to filter the information by focusing on smaller groups. The final assignment, creation of a digital artifact, was a perfect conclusion for me. I didn't want to take a test, or quiz, I wanted to learn digital tools, creating the digital artifact gave me the challenge and task of learning those tools. I was very pleased with the results of my artifact and the meaningful feedback I received. I think the course could be improved by providing time to teach students how to do meaningful assessment.
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Chris M profile image
Chris M profile image
8/10 starsCompleted
  • 1 review
  • 1 completed
6 years, 8 months ago
This is a great course, although it is very self-directed, so don't expect to receive a lot of feedback/support automatically. That said, I thought this was an advantage in that you can direct your own learning, and if you engage with social media, you will find a lot of support and feedback, for example through #edcmooc and #edcmchat on Twitter.
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Sadhana Ramchander profile image
Sadhana Ramchander profile image
8/10 starsCompleted
  • 1 review
  • 1 completed
6 years, 8 months ago
\- Overall impression: one of amazement at a course that works, despite there being 42,000 students! \- In fact, a lot of learning happens from student interactions during, and even after the course ends. \- Overwhelmed at first, this being my first online course, but settled down after 2 days. \- Not only did I get plenty of food for thought regarding digital cultures, but learnt about various online platforms that one can use in education and presentations. \- I am positive I will use the skills I learnt in this course somewhere. \- People who are not very savvy with digital media likely to be put off, so something should be done to address this. \- An introductory meeting with the instructors before the course begins, could help.
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Jen Score profile image
Jen Score profile image
7/10 starsCompleted
  • 1 review
  • 1 completed
6 years, 8 months ago
I liked this course. The topic was a heavy hitter intellectually. There was an overwhelming amount of material, but the professors negotiated a good compromise for the time constraints. I spent 8 hours more because I was addicted to the learning. I especially liked the demonstration of how to use technology in education. it was well worth the time. The other students provided tons of insights.
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Mubarak Alkhatnai profile image
Mubarak Alkhatnai profile image
8/10 starsCompleted
  • 3 reviews
  • 2 completed
6 years, 8 months ago
This courses is an introductory one to the digital culture idea and its related topics. It introduced many interesting ideas about how technology shaped people's past and will continue to do that in the future. The best thing I liked about this course is the tentativeness of the tutors and their willingness to help and engage with students. Very well organized too.
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Kimmie profile image
Kimmie profile image
8/10 starsCompleted
  • 2 reviews
  • 2 completed
6 years, 8 months ago
This was one of the first online courses I have done and I really enjoyed it, but probably because I am a reflective type of person. If you want structured lectures and related activities this is not for you. The zealous nature of the participants working in multiple spaces was completely overwhelming to the extent I didnt' really engage with them. However I really enjoyed the final assignment and I have used my digital artefact at a conference on youth leadership and everyone really was impacted by the topics. I would have liked to see more exploration of the elearning side of the course as this is something that I'm not sure every person got based on the peer review work I had to do. Overall I loved the experience, but certainly this style of learning is not for everyone
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