Early Renaissance Architecture in Italy: from Alberti to Bramante

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4/10 stars
based on  3 reviews
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Early Renaissance Architecture in Italy: from Alberti to Bramante

Course Details

Cost

FREE

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  • TBA

Course Provider

Coursera online courses
Coursera's online classes are designed to help students achieve mastery over course material. Some of the best professors in the world - like neurobiology professor and author Peggy Mason from the University of Chicago, and computer science professor and Folding@Home director Vijay Pande - will supplement your knowledge through video lectures. They will also provide challenging assessments, interactive exercises during each lesson, and the opportunity to use a mobile app to keep up with yo...
Coursera's online classes are designed to help students achieve mastery over course material. Some of the best professors in the world - like neurobiology professor and author Peggy Mason from the University of Chicago, and computer science professor and Folding@Home director Vijay Pande - will supplement your knowledge through video lectures. They will also provide challenging assessments, interactive exercises during each lesson, and the opportunity to use a mobile app to keep up with your coursework. Coursera also partners with the US State Department to create “learning hubs” around the world. Students can get internet access, take courses, and participate in weekly in-person study groups to make learning even more collaborative. Begin your journey into the mysteries of the human brain by taking courses in neuroscience. Learn how to navigate the data infrastructures that multinational corporations use when you discover the world of data analysis. Follow one of Coursera’s “Skill Tracks”. Or try any one of its more than 560 available courses to help you achieve your academic and professional goals.

Provider Subject Specialization
Humanities
Sciences & Technology
4810 reviews

Course Description

Through some of the most celebrated examples of the early Renaissance architecture and the most important statements of the early Renaissance theories, the course will examine problems of the architectural spaces, technology and forms looking to the antiquity in the XV century in Italy.
Reviews 4/10 stars
3 Reviews for Early Renaissance Architecture in Italy: from Alberti to Bramante

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Mario Traversi profile image
Mario Traversi profile image
4/10 starsTaking Now
  • 2 reviews
  • 1 completed
6 years, 3 months ago
Sadly this course is simply a professor reading from his book. His english is slow and because he is reading the course material is not as engaging as it could be. Little more than a catalogue of early renaissance architecture, but it does show the link with Roman architecture. Although the audience would be less, the professor should talk naturally in Italian!
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Maryna Lagereva profile image
Maryna Lagereva profile image
3/10 starsCompleted
  • 7 reviews
  • 6 completed
5 years, 9 months ago
I had to drop the course as the speech of the lecturer was awful. Very slow, very strong accent, very many mistakes. The video lectures were not very interesting as it looked like the professor was reading Wikipedia. I am sorry, but I would not recommend this course to anyone.
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Student profile image
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Student

5/10 starsCompleted
6 years, 3 months ago
Prior to taking this course I had some general knowledge of the architecture of antiquity and the Renaissance and had visited some of the buildings discussed, such as the Duomo in Florence. The course itself is very much 'talking head' with slides in the background. The problem is that the lectures are rather poor quality translations of Italian originals, delivered in a strong Italian accent which is sometimes difficult to make out. There are grammatical errors and many, many flaws in idiom. This makes it hard to get to the literal sense of what is being said. There are computerized sub titles which are a mixed blessing and which state 'inaudible' at frequent intervals, including at times when what was said was audible to me. The subject matter itself is easy: it is the language through which it is delivered which makes it difficult. Those whose first language isn't English appear to find it especially difficult. I found the use of ... Prior to taking this course I had some general knowledge of the architecture of antiquity and the Renaissance and had visited some of the buildings discussed, such as the Duomo in Florence. The course itself is very much 'talking head' with slides in the background. The problem is that the lectures are rather poor quality translations of Italian originals, delivered in a strong Italian accent which is sometimes difficult to make out. There are grammatical errors and many, many flaws in idiom. This makes it hard to get to the literal sense of what is being said. There are computerized sub titles which are a mixed blessing and which state 'inaudible' at frequent intervals, including at times when what was said was audible to me. The subject matter itself is easy: it is the language through which it is delivered which makes it difficult. Those whose first language isn't English appear to find it especially difficult. I found the use of the term 'final solution' to describe one feature of design unfortunate. Not only were the associations of this word regrettable but also many students were not certain what it actually meant. I think it meant something like 'decision about what to do in terms of pillars and columns when you get to the end of a wall'. Some students have taken it on themselves to produce written transcripts with illustrations and these are a great help. The quizzes are simple factual ones, and easily answered correctly, especially if tackled with a transcript open while you do them. Spot the doric, ionian, corinthian is a common choice of question. But even in the quizzes the English language is not correct. In one there is an example of subject - verb disagreement. Nothing particularly theoretical or abstract here. The pictures are nice. A mixed blessing: whether I shall complete I don't know. The prof is clearly an acknowledged expert in the field, so I suppose that this course doesn't really do him justice and that is a shame. One noticeable thing and positive thing is the way that the students work together to answer each other's questions. If you want to learn to recognise and name features of Renaissance Architecture and to learn a little about some of the architects of that time, and especially if you intend to visit Florence or to tour Italy, then I think it would be worth having a go at the course. You may be put off by the delivery issues, you may not.
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