Economics of Money and Banking, Part Two

Provided by:
9/10 stars
based on  3 reviews
Provided by:
Cost FREE
Start Date On demand
Economics of Money and Banking, Part Two

Course Details

Cost

FREE

Upcoming Schedule

  • On demand

Course Provider

Coursera online courses
Coursera's online classes are designed to help students achieve mastery over course material. Some of the best professors in the world - like neurobiology professor and author Peggy Mason from the University of Chicago, and computer science professor and Folding@Home director Vijay Pande - will supplement your knowledge through video lectures. They will also provide challenging assessments, interactive exercises during each lesson, and the opportunity to use a mobile app to keep up with yo...
Coursera's online classes are designed to help students achieve mastery over course material. Some of the best professors in the world - like neurobiology professor and author Peggy Mason from the University of Chicago, and computer science professor and Folding@Home director Vijay Pande - will supplement your knowledge through video lectures. They will also provide challenging assessments, interactive exercises during each lesson, and the opportunity to use a mobile app to keep up with your coursework. Coursera also partners with the US State Department to create “learning hubs” around the world. Students can get internet access, take courses, and participate in weekly in-person study groups to make learning even more collaborative. Begin your journey into the mysteries of the human brain by taking courses in neuroscience. Learn how to navigate the data infrastructures that multinational corporations use when you discover the world of data analysis. Follow one of Coursera’s “Skill Tracks”. Or try any one of its more than 560 available courses to help you achieve your academic and professional goals.

Provider Subject Specialization
Humanities
Sciences & Technology
4663 reviews

Course Description

Introduction to a “money view” of economic activity for modern times, building on the intellectual traditions of British central banking and American institutionalism. Part One explores the economics of payment systems and money markets. Part Two explores connections with foreign exchange and capital markets. NOTE: The first week of Part Two reviews Part One, so you can take Part Two even if you missed Part One.
Reviews 9/10 stars
3 Reviews for Economics of Money and Banking, Part Two

Ratings details

  • 5 stars
  • 4 stars
  • 3 stars
  • 2 stars
  • 1 stars
  • 5 stars
  • 4 stars
  • 3 stars
  • 2 stars
  • 1 stars
  • 5 stars
  • 4 stars
  • 3 stars
  • 2 stars
  • 1 stars

Rankings are based on a provider's overall CourseTalk score, which takes into account both average rating and number of ratings. Stars round to the nearest half.

Sort By
Thomas Forsell profile image
Thomas Forsell profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 2 reviews
  • 2 completed
4 years, 5 months ago
Was this review helpful? Yes0
 Flag
Ricardo Teixeira profile image
Ricardo Teixeira profile image
7/10 starsCompleted
  • 86 reviews
  • 77 completed
4 years, 6 months ago
This second part of the course did not deliver on its promise. The instructor said, during part 1, that we shouldn't be worried if things didn't make sense, because typically students only get "it" after the second part. That's hardly so. This second part was more confusing in some respects than part 1. The first week is a repetition of part 1, Then you move straight to new topics, always filled with technical jargon that at times becomes impossible to follow and other times is dull considering the repetition. If I had taken this class in school I would have needed to study a lot from textbooks to get a decent grade, because of the unstructured and "all over the place" nature of the classes. However, don't get me wrong! The course is far from bad. I sympathize wholeheartedly with the instructor's approach to finance and I think his ideas are a breath of fresh air. He is truly an original in his field and it is a privilege to lea... This second part of the course did not deliver on its promise. The instructor said, during part 1, that we shouldn't be worried if things didn't make sense, because typically students only get "it" after the second part. That's hardly so. This second part was more confusing in some respects than part 1. The first week is a repetition of part 1, Then you move straight to new topics, always filled with technical jargon that at times becomes impossible to follow and other times is dull considering the repetition. If I had taken this class in school I would have needed to study a lot from textbooks to get a decent grade, because of the unstructured and "all over the place" nature of the classes. However, don't get me wrong! The course is far from bad. I sympathize wholeheartedly with the instructor's approach to finance and I think his ideas are a breath of fresh air. He is truly an original in his field and it is a privilege to learn from him. Despite all its shortcomings, you will learn more about finance and banking in this course than any other. So in a sense I recommend it - I just can't see what all the fuss is about (looking at the extremely high rates this course has received).
Was this review helpful? Yes0
 Flag
Nancy Walsh profile image
Nancy Walsh profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 4 reviews
  • 4 completed
5 years, 2 months ago
I have no real experience with economics, but Dr. Mehrling's excellent lectures, lecture notes and presentation skills made this, along with Part One, among the best courses available online. Original ideas and clear explanations only made me want more of the same. Here's my vote asking Dr, Mehrling to for a Part Three.
Was this review helpful? Yes0
 Flag

Rating Details


  • 5 stars
  • 4 stars
  • 3 stars
  • 2 stars
  • 1 stars
  • 5 stars
  • 4 stars
  • 3 stars
  • 2 stars
  • 1 stars
  • 5 stars
  • 4 stars
  • 3 stars
  • 2 stars
  • 1 stars

Rankings are based on a provider's overall CourseTalk score, which takes into account both average rating and number of ratings. Stars round to the nearest half.