Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

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9/10 stars
based on  6 reviews
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Cost FREE
Start Date TBA
Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

Course Details

Cost

FREE

Upcoming Schedule

  • TBA

Course Provider

Coursera online courses
Coursera's online classes are designed to help students achieve mastery over course material. Some of the best professors in the world - like neurobiology professor and author Peggy Mason from the University of Chicago, and computer science professor and Folding@Home director Vijay Pande - will supplement your knowledge through video lectures. They will also provide challenging assessments, interactive exercises during each lesson, and the opportunity to use a mobile app to keep up with yo...
Coursera's online classes are designed to help students achieve mastery over course material. Some of the best professors in the world - like neurobiology professor and author Peggy Mason from the University of Chicago, and computer science professor and Folding@Home director Vijay Pande - will supplement your knowledge through video lectures. They will also provide challenging assessments, interactive exercises during each lesson, and the opportunity to use a mobile app to keep up with your coursework. Coursera also partners with the US State Department to create “learning hubs” around the world. Students can get internet access, take courses, and participate in weekly in-person study groups to make learning even more collaborative. Begin your journey into the mysteries of the human brain by taking courses in neuroscience. Learn how to navigate the data infrastructures that multinational corporations use when you discover the world of data analysis. Follow one of Coursera’s “Skill Tracks”. Or try any one of its more than 560 available courses to help you achieve your academic and professional goals.

Provider Subject Specialization
Humanities
Sciences & Technology
4715 reviews

Course Description

Learn how to apply mathematical methods to philosophical problems and questions.
Reviews 9/10 stars
6 Reviews for Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

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Justine Ivan profile image
Justine Ivan profile image
8/10 starsCompleted
  • 15 reviews
  • 9 completed
5 years, 10 months ago
There are no weekly graded quizzes or assignments. BUT there are a lot of exercises you can do and are important for appercepting the contents of the course. The notations & math and philosophy combined is very intriguing for me, the reason why I enrolled. It is not easy to understand. A lot of reading, thinking (long pauses and blank stares) and exercises (doodling) is needed to really get the feel and depth of the course. There will soon be a graded final exam. Hannes and Stephan said that we shouldn't worry about it as it would be easy and not very important as the goal of their course is to get people excited about mathematical philosophy. We'll see. \---update--- The final exam was really not much of a pain but requires enough familiarity from the lessons presented throughout the course. The MOOC is a great introduction to Mathematical Philosophy. I am not sure how to better approach the learning of the topic but the length of t... There are no weekly graded quizzes or assignments. BUT there are a lot of exercises you can do and are important for appercepting the contents of the course. The notations & math and philosophy combined is very intriguing for me, the reason why I enrolled. It is not easy to understand. A lot of reading, thinking (long pauses and blank stares) and exercises (doodling) is needed to really get the feel and depth of the course. There will soon be a graded final exam. Hannes and Stephan said that we shouldn't worry about it as it would be easy and not very important as the goal of their course is to get people excited about mathematical philosophy. We'll see. \---update--- The final exam was really not much of a pain but requires enough familiarity from the lessons presented throughout the course. The MOOC is a great introduction to Mathematical Philosophy. I am not sure how to better approach the learning of the topic but the length of the videos per week is somewhat in the excess and I thought the practice part of the learning of this topic is vital and the lack of a better structure/guidance in doing it is a negative mark for the course.
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Kristina Šekrst profile image
Kristina Šekrst profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 102 reviews
  • 102 completed
3 years, 10 months ago
This is a great course, and the amount of trouble can clearly be seen. I love the fact that the new lectures are being added for the second iteration, and I simply cannot praise enough the booklets that accompanied each lecture. One could just read these tutorials and feel like it's a lecture on its own. The only critique I have of this course is the lack of quizzes, since it's easy to fall behind, but the instructors preferred to stay within the traditional approach, as they have explained in the last video entry. Even though there are no quizzes, there are lots of problems to solve, and there are active discussion forums, so that fixes things a bit. This course gives a great blend of mathematics and philosophy, but it relies more heavily on the mathematical part and proofs, so this is a simple caveat.
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Rafael V. Ribeiro profile image
Rafael V. Ribeiro profile image
7/10 starsCompleted
  • 8 reviews
  • 8 completed
5 years ago
Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy is introductory. That may seem redundant, but it's the truth: the course does not aim to make of you a mathematical philosopher, but rather to showcase to you some of the main areas of the subject, covering each of them per week, mostly. The lectures are too much like a book, and a bit boring or confusing at times -even the teachers acknowledge that, and they said they planned to provide the students with written texts for the next offerings. But if you are patient and willing, you may get quite a lot out of it, and have a great time learning about questions you may or not ever have asked yourself (and if you did, you probably couldn't answer them, either!). It's overall a great experience, I think, for anyone interested in Math and Philosophy. However, despite the content being somewhat deep, passing the course is very easy. They chose to evaluate students through quizzes rather than written e... Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy is introductory. That may seem redundant, but it's the truth: the course does not aim to make of you a mathematical philosopher, but rather to showcase to you some of the main areas of the subject, covering each of them per week, mostly. The lectures are too much like a book, and a bit boring or confusing at times -even the teachers acknowledge that, and they said they planned to provide the students with written texts for the next offerings. But if you are patient and willing, you may get quite a lot out of it, and have a great time learning about questions you may or not ever have asked yourself (and if you did, you probably couldn't answer them, either!). It's overall a great experience, I think, for anyone interested in Math and Philosophy. However, despite the content being somewhat deep, passing the course is very easy. They chose to evaluate students through quizzes rather than written essays, which I find is a good thing (may I remind you that usually essays (and other more 'creative' work) in Coursera is often peer-graded, that is, you grade other student's works, who in turn grade yours, and usually no teacher or TA is involved in this process, which sometimes leads to unfairness). All in all, quizzes do make the course easier, but more fair.
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Jack Rogers profile image
Jack Rogers profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 14 reviews
  • 8 completed
4 years, 11 months ago
This course will begin on 29 July 2014, and I'm very thrilled to have finally found a course on ' MATHEMATICAL PHILOSOPHY '...! I will finish this review upon successful completion of the course.
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Julia Cook profile image
Julia Cook profile image
9/10 starsCompleted
  • 5 reviews
  • 5 completed
5 years, 9 months ago
I had studied philosophy at degree level but have no mathematical or science background beyond introductory logic. I found this course really interesting and informative and really liked the style of the lectures. Having no maths background I struggled a bit and got frightened. I didn't realise how much I had understood and learned, however until I took the test. I had only watched about three weeks' worth of lectures at that stage and got almost full marks up to that point. I couldn't even understand the questions regarding the rest of the course. I've gone back and watched more lectures now and would like to try the test again, but have left it too late. For non-mathematicians there's a lot of work. There are also links to a great deal of reading if you are interested in following up on the development of the ideas covered in the lectures. There are examples to work through and opportunities to test your understanding with question... I had studied philosophy at degree level but have no mathematical or science background beyond introductory logic. I found this course really interesting and informative and really liked the style of the lectures. Having no maths background I struggled a bit and got frightened. I didn't realise how much I had understood and learned, however until I took the test. I had only watched about three weeks' worth of lectures at that stage and got almost full marks up to that point. I couldn't even understand the questions regarding the rest of the course. I've gone back and watched more lectures now and would like to try the test again, but have left it too late. For non-mathematicians there's a lot of work. There are also links to a great deal of reading if you are interested in following up on the development of the ideas covered in the lectures. There are examples to work through and opportunities to test your understanding with questions within the lectures. I will certainly be taking this course a second time if it is offered again.
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Ricardo Teixeira profile image
Ricardo Teixeira profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 86 reviews
  • 77 completed
5 years, 10 months ago
Not everyone will agree, but I loved this course. If you take it will understand just how math and philosophy share a common reasoning. You will see just how absurd it is to distinguish between social and natural sciences, because science is all the same: it means knowledge. This course will give you the tools for better reasoning. You should know that it's difficult to stomach it - the lectures are challenging and tough to follow. The evaluation, on the other hand, is very simple; there are no weekly quizzes but you do take an easy final exam. If you like philosophy or math, or if you simply want to understand how logic is so important as the ground level for thought in any discipline, this is the course for you.
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