Malicious Software and its Underground Economy: Two Sides to Every Story

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7/10 stars
based on  6 reviews
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Malicious Software and its Underground Economy: Two Sides to Every Story

Course Details

Cost

FREE

Upcoming Schedule

  • On demand

Course Provider

Coursera online courses
Coursera's online classes are designed to help students achieve mastery over course material. Some of the best professors in the world - like neurobiology professor and author Peggy Mason from the University of Chicago, and computer science professor and Folding@Home director Vijay Pande - will supplement your knowledge through video lectures. They will also provide challenging assessments, interactive exercises during each lesson, and the opportunity to use a mobile app to keep up with yo...
Coursera's online classes are designed to help students achieve mastery over course material. Some of the best professors in the world - like neurobiology professor and author Peggy Mason from the University of Chicago, and computer science professor and Folding@Home director Vijay Pande - will supplement your knowledge through video lectures. They will also provide challenging assessments, interactive exercises during each lesson, and the opportunity to use a mobile app to keep up with your coursework. Coursera also partners with the US State Department to create “learning hubs” around the world. Students can get internet access, take courses, and participate in weekly in-person study groups to make learning even more collaborative. Begin your journey into the mysteries of the human brain by taking courses in neuroscience. Learn how to navigate the data infrastructures that multinational corporations use when you discover the world of data analysis. Follow one of Coursera’s “Skill Tracks”. Or try any one of its more than 560 available courses to help you achieve your academic and professional goals.

Provider Subject Specialization
Humanities
Sciences & Technology
4719 reviews

Course Description

Learn about traditional and mobile malware, the security threats they represent, state-of-the-art analysis and detection techniques, and the underground ecosystem that drives such a profitable but illegal business.
Reviews 7/10 stars
6 Reviews for Malicious Software and its Underground Economy: Two Sides to Every Story

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Rankings are based on a provider's overall CourseTalk score, which takes into account both average rating and number of ratings. Stars round to the nearest half.

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vaggelas profile image
vaggelas profile image
9/10 starsCompleted
  • 28 reviews
  • 26 completed
5 years, 10 months ago
This is a course abouth malware and virus,their history and how they work. It is a very helpful course from a very good professor. The first offering had some flaws but i hope next ones will be better. It is not an easy course(you maybe complete it with few hours per week but to fully understand everything you need to try hard and to have a lot of prereqs). Pros : Kind of unique Mooc , Professor was very good and open for changes , Video lectures were high quality and multicameras Cons : In the first lectures,professor seemed not familiar with the camera , Sometimes it was a analysis Course,sometimes a programming course , There were a lot of readings that were required
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Winthrop Yu profile image
Winthrop Yu profile image
8/10 starsCompleted
  • 33 reviews
  • 27 completed
5 years, 10 months ago
Good introductory overview to malware, though the course could be extended a bit to cover more detail. Prior knowledge of computer architecture is not only recommended, it should be required (e.g. there's Assembler in week 2), else the material and concepts are readily accessible. There were some technical issues during the 1st version of the class (e.g. insufficient focus on slides and material), but the professor and teaching/production staff are very open to suggestions and i expect the next version to be much improved.
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Don Radick profile image
Don Radick profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 3 reviews
  • 3 completed
6 years, 1 month ago
Great professor - very knowledgeable, and delivered the course in easy chunks. The course did suffer a bit from trying to deliver too much in a 6 week format. The assmbly language part was very dificult for many, but it was necessary to introduce the subject. I would like to take another course on this subject from this professor.
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Jeanne Boyarsky profile image
Jeanne Boyarsky profile image
5/10 starsCompleted
  • 33 reviews
  • 29 completed
6 years, 1 month ago
I took the first run of this course and you could clearly see that the professor was learning the ropes of online ed. The professor did try to improve things over the span of the course, so I think many of these things will get fixed. Each week there were lectures, "recommended readings, a quiz and one bonus assignment. The lectures got better over time. At the beginning, we saw the instructor and his laptop in lieu of the slides - especially when talking about assembly language. At the end, the instructor was in a small box on the side and the lectures were on the main part of the screen. This was better, but there was a visible flicker. More importantly, the lectures didn't feel like "coursera" style. They didn't contain inline quizzes and were long - most were 15-30 minutes, with one at 42 minutes. This isn't going to be changed - the professor feels the topics couldn't be separated. Of course they could. One can always ask questi... I took the first run of this course and you could clearly see that the professor was learning the ropes of online ed. The professor did try to improve things over the span of the course, so I think many of these things will get fixed. Each week there were lectures, "recommended readings, a quiz and one bonus assignment. The lectures got better over time. At the beginning, we saw the instructor and his laptop in lieu of the slides - especially when talking about assembly language. At the end, the instructor was in a small box on the side and the lectures were on the main part of the screen. This was better, but there was a visible flicker. More importantly, the lectures didn't feel like "coursera" style. They didn't contain inline quizzes and were long - most were 15-30 minutes, with one at 42 minutes. This isn't going to be changed - the professor feels the topics couldn't be separated. Of course they could. One can always ask questions inline or add a break. "Recommended" readings - if the readings are asked about in the quiz, they aren't recommended. They are required. The readings were long papers. I didn't have time to read them so read the executive summary and skimmed. Quizes - The professor posted the lectures a number of days before the quiz was posted in hopes students would separate the two. I didn't. I used the quizzes as a guide of what to focus on. For those interested in grades, it was almost impossible to fail. 60% on the quiz is passing and 80% (plus bonus) is distinction. However, you get 3 attempts at the 10-15 question quiz and the answers don't change. Statistically, you should be doing quite well. Bonus assignment - this was interesting as we got to apply the techniques in the class. It wasn't particularly hard - mainly applying what done in lecture. But it was still interesting to do. Content - The course was a mix of high level/general knowledge, specific examples and assembly language. Programming knowledge and operating system knowledge was a pre-req. I did have that and was fine with the assembly language part.
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Duncan Murray profile image
Duncan Murray profile image
7/10 starsCompleted
  • 25 reviews
  • 24 completed
6 years, 1 month ago
This course was so short that I didn't really feel like I was in doing it - but I am glad I did it. The reverse engineering exercise seemed daunting at first, as I had never done serious assembly programming before, but it was fun to do (took about an hour). There were a lot of general facts discussed, and the quiz's basically tested that you watched the videos, though he did a good job of giving an interesting overview of the malware situation. You definitely need to be a programmer to pass this though - I used Python, but the exercises are calculation style so you can use any language. Since it was such a short course you won't get into any *real* depth of cracking the malware, but I would recommend this course to get a current overview and want to play with some assembler.
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jledoux profile image
jledoux profile image
5/10 starsCompleted
  • 5 reviews
  • 5 completed
6 years, 1 month ago
First, the professor gets 4 stars in my book, but the course gets 2. He really tried to listen to students and was really responsive in improving the course and getting feedback. But the aim of the course was too loosely defined and honestly I feel I learned next to nothing besides some malware jargon taking the course and a brief overview of the extent of malware out there. To really understand malware, you have to really understand the machine language code, operating system, and all the internals. You need to do a lot of programming and really get it. E.g., assembly can't be learned in half a lecture by walking through one example. So you don't really learn or practice anything in this course, you just get a first exposure to a bunch of topics. The first lectures were bad format-wise, as it was the prof going through a powerpoint slide, without the powerpoint slide only being zoomed in briefly barely long enough to read. Granted t... First, the professor gets 4 stars in my book, but the course gets 2. He really tried to listen to students and was really responsive in improving the course and getting feedback. But the aim of the course was too loosely defined and honestly I feel I learned next to nothing besides some malware jargon taking the course and a brief overview of the extent of malware out there. To really understand malware, you have to really understand the machine language code, operating system, and all the internals. You need to do a lot of programming and really get it. E.g., assembly can't be learned in half a lecture by walking through one example. So you don't really learn or practice anything in this course, you just get a first exposure to a bunch of topics. The first lectures were bad format-wise, as it was the prof going through a powerpoint slide, without the powerpoint slide only being zoomed in briefly barely long enough to read. Granted this was adjusted after student complaints. There's no book or further source to look up. The quiz questions just contained random factoids from the lectures or recommended readings -- which were just a collection of academic papers (not really at the appropriate level for the course). The factoids don't have enough of a basis for you to really grok, so you just end up regurgitating a few facts. E.g., at "the bottom of the kernel stack points to the current executing thread" or China's malware forums are on Baidu and QQ or the main target of phishing in China according in 2011 according to APAC was "____" (and list the top four choices). Also the quiz questions never changed, making it really easy to get a perfect score in your three attempts. The one programming challenge took maybe 30 minutes (and most of that was just figuring out what format he wanted the answer in).
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