Physics 1 for Physical Science Majors

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9/10 stars
based on  4 reviews
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Course Details

Cost

FREE

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  • On demand

Course Provider

Coursera online courses
Coursera's online classes are designed to help students achieve mastery over course material. Some of the best professors in the world - like neurobiology professor and author Peggy Mason from the University of Chicago, and computer science professor and Folding@Home director Vijay Pande - will supplement your knowledge through video lectures. They will also provide challenging assessments, interactive exercises during each lesson, and the opportunity to use a mobile app to keep up with yo...
Coursera's online classes are designed to help students achieve mastery over course material. Some of the best professors in the world - like neurobiology professor and author Peggy Mason from the University of Chicago, and computer science professor and Folding@Home director Vijay Pande - will supplement your knowledge through video lectures. They will also provide challenging assessments, interactive exercises during each lesson, and the opportunity to use a mobile app to keep up with your coursework. Coursera also partners with the US State Department to create “learning hubs” around the world. Students can get internet access, take courses, and participate in weekly in-person study groups to make learning even more collaborative. Begin your journey into the mysteries of the human brain by taking courses in neuroscience. Learn how to navigate the data infrastructures that multinational corporations use when you discover the world of data analysis. Follow one of Coursera’s “Skill Tracks”. Or try any one of its more than 560 available courses to help you achieve your academic and professional goals.

Provider Subject Specialization
Humanities
Sciences & Technology
4721 reviews

Course Description

This is a 12 week course, currently scheduled to start on Monday, April 14, 2014 and finishing on Friday, July 11. This introductory physics course is intended for physical science majors and others desiring a rigorous introduction to physics. It closely parallels the brick-and-mortar course given to the freshmen at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The course covers classical mechanics, including kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws, and applications.
Reviews 9/10 stars
4 Reviews for Physics 1 for Physical Science Majors

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Rankings are based on a provider's overall CourseTalk score, which takes into account both average rating and number of ratings. Stars round to the nearest half.

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Brion profile image
Brion profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 1 review
  • 1 completed
5 years, 9 months ago
You may be like me, and have done some Mechanics in a first semester module/you may have encountered it just before university, and you may have passed those, making you think you understand classical mechanics or physics 1 - that's what I thought, but after taking this course (as a refresher for my teaching career), I realise how physics 1 was never given the comprehensive love it deserves (especially considering how the godly praise & worship Newton was given for these discoveries). Dubson explains concepts well by using: [1] Observational experience (through a video, real experiment or a VERY clever virtual experiment, or sometimes both because the virtual experiment can do things like stop time & graph things for you!) [2] Origin of discovery & History (who & how was it discovered? why was it? meaning of word?) [3] Contextual application of concepts (how has the concepts been used & why is it used? i.e. for engineering purposes, ... You may be like me, and have done some Mechanics in a first semester module/you may have encountered it just before university, and you may have passed those, making you think you understand classical mechanics or physics 1 - that's what I thought, but after taking this course (as a refresher for my teaching career), I realise how physics 1 was never given the comprehensive love it deserves (especially considering how the godly praise & worship Newton was given for these discoveries). Dubson explains concepts well by using: [1] Observational experience (through a video, real experiment or a VERY clever virtual experiment, or sometimes both because the virtual experiment can do things like stop time & graph things for you!) [2] Origin of discovery & History (who & how was it discovered? why was it? meaning of word?) [3] Contextual application of concepts (how has the concepts been used & why is it used? i.e. for engineering purposes, like conservation of angular momentum being used for the Hubble telescope, how you can find the speed of a car from skid marks, how the speed of a bullet hitting a target can be found) Those 3 points are what I've found (so far) to be vital ingredients in learning anything. I.e. [1] How does it work (it must be experienced in a way that which allowed the original discovers brains to think of the concepts in the first place), [2] How/why did it come about? [3] What is it used for? Not only does Dubson do those 3 things very well, but he tests the concepts CONSTANTLY in-class in context of questions after the concepts are taught using those 3 ingredients. The questions are clever in really ELUCIDATING the concepts further. They do this because he tries to understand the physics tools/exact knowledge required to answer a question, and the potential misconceptions that may occur. Coursera's website seemed to be easier to navigate & neater than edX; which is why I chose to do Physics 1 here instead of there. Walter Lewin is a renowned professor & teacher, and I think Dubson if he continues, can easily surpass his teaching status. What makes him particularly different (as well as the great use of those 3 ingredients I mentioned above) is the use concept tests in class & the virtual experiments from PhET. I took this class as a refresher to physics 1 as I intend to teach it at Secondary (high school) Advanced level. I didn't think I would also learn pedagogically useful tools & methods AS WELL. That's my 2 cents anyway. (No I was not paid for this review, the guy's class really is that damn good at engaging & being comprehensive. If you're scared of the maths - let me tell you I'm dyscalculaic. The maths never feels unnecessary, [except 1 tiny bit & he will tell you why], and you can easily see the reason WHY you're doing it to help elucidate physical phenomena in ways you cannot otherwise understand.)
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Student

10/10 starsCompleted
5 years ago
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Nigel Visser profile image
Nigel Visser profile image
9/10 starsTaking Now
  • 1 review
  • 0 completed
5 years, 5 months ago
I have done high school physics, and some college classical mechanics. This course is a very good introduction into college grade classical mechanics, the professor is fun to listen to and the assignments are mentally challenging sometimes. One dislike for me personally, was that the videos are 15 minutes or longer (up to half an hour) this makes it tougher to get through them
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Roger Leyster profile image
Roger Leyster profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 11 reviews
  • 10 completed
2 years, 9 months ago
Summary: A truly excellent first-semester Physics course for those not afraid of a little math. Topics: First-semester Physics kinematics topics including one- and two-dimensional motion, Newtons Laws of motion, circular motion, the conservation laws of energy, momentum, and angular momentum, Newton's law of gravity. Background: To do well in this course you will need to be comfortable with algebraic manipulation. Although calculus is not strictly necessary, it helps if you understand differentiation. (Frankly: you cannot really understand the laws of motion without knowing what a derivative is.) Lectures: Prof. Dubson is an outstanding lecturer, one of the best I have ever seen in my many years of taking college courses. He is enthusiastic, articulate, and has excellent chalk-board skills. There are three lectures each week of approximately 30 minutes each. He gave in-class demonstrations which very much helped clarify m... Summary: A truly excellent first-semester Physics course for those not afraid of a little math. Topics: First-semester Physics kinematics topics including one- and two-dimensional motion, Newtons Laws of motion, circular motion, the conservation laws of energy, momentum, and angular momentum, Newton's law of gravity. Background: To do well in this course you will need to be comfortable with algebraic manipulation. Although calculus is not strictly necessary, it helps if you understand differentiation. (Frankly: you cannot really understand the laws of motion without knowing what a derivative is.) Lectures: Prof. Dubson is an outstanding lecturer, one of the best I have ever seen in my many years of taking college courses. He is enthusiastic, articulate, and has excellent chalk-board skills. There are three lectures each week of approximately 30 minutes each. He gave in-class demonstrations which very much helped clarify many of the concepts (e.g., conservation of linear and angular momentum, moments of inertial, etc.). In-Lecture Quizzes: There are a healthy number of in-lecture concept quizzes which do a good job of making you less of a passive listener and more an engaged participant. The in-lecture quizzes are also given to the students in the lecture hall so you get to see how well you do compared to the other students. Assigned Work: There is a homework assignment for each week's lecture. These do what good homework assignments should do: clarifies the lecture concepts by asking you to think through problems. There were two one-hour mid-terms and a two-and-a-half hour Final exam. Labs: There are no labs. Given that this is an online course, this is not surprising, but if they could figure out some way to pair the rest of this course with a hands-on lab component, this would be the perfect physics course. There are some very helpful on-line lab simulators, though. These can be found by doing a web search for "phetsim". Supplementary Material: A helpful set of lecture notes in PDF format was provided. Also, practice exams and solutions were made available before each exam. Forums: The forum traffic was a little light, but there were several people who were ready to help explain things, and the official course personnel would often post clarifications. IN CONCLUSION: I learned a great deal and thoroughly enjoyed the lectures and assignments. It is astounding that such a high-quality course was made available for free. (Course taken Fall 2013)
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