Social and Economic Networks: Models and Analysis

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8/10 stars
based on  6 reviews
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Start Date TBA
Social and Economic Networks: Models and Analysis

Course Details

Cost

FREE

Upcoming Schedule

  • TBA

Course Provider

Coursera online courses
Coursera's online classes are designed to help students achieve mastery over course material. Some of the best professors in the world - like neurobiology professor and author Peggy Mason from the University of Chicago, and computer science professor and Folding@Home director Vijay Pande - will supplement your knowledge through video lectures. They will also provide challenging assessments, interactive exercises during each lesson, and the opportunity to use a mobile app to keep up with yo...
Coursera's online classes are designed to help students achieve mastery over course material. Some of the best professors in the world - like neurobiology professor and author Peggy Mason from the University of Chicago, and computer science professor and Folding@Home director Vijay Pande - will supplement your knowledge through video lectures. They will also provide challenging assessments, interactive exercises during each lesson, and the opportunity to use a mobile app to keep up with your coursework. Coursera also partners with the US State Department to create “learning hubs” around the world. Students can get internet access, take courses, and participate in weekly in-person study groups to make learning even more collaborative. Begin your journey into the mysteries of the human brain by taking courses in neuroscience. Learn how to navigate the data infrastructures that multinational corporations use when you discover the world of data analysis. Follow one of Coursera’s “Skill Tracks”. Or try any one of its more than 560 available courses to help you achieve your academic and professional goals.

Provider Subject Specialization
Humanities
Sciences & Technology
4733 reviews

Course Description

Learn how to model social and economic networks and their impact on human behavior. How do networks form, why do they exhibit certain patterns, and how does their structure impact diffusion, learning, and other behaviors? We will bring together models and techniques from economics, sociology, math, physics, statistics and computer science to answer these questions.
Reviews 8/10 stars
6 Reviews for Social and Economic Networks: Models and Analysis

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Greg Hamel profile image
Greg Hamel profile image
7/10 starsCompleted
  • 116 reviews
  • 107 completed
5 years ago
Social and economic networks is an introductory network theory and analysis course geared toward learners who have are comfortable with basic statistics, probability and linear algebra. You don't need to know anything about social networks ahead of time to take this course, but having basic familiarity with networks will help things go a bit smoother. The course has 7 weeks of lecture content covering network basics, measures of centrality, network formation models and diffusion, learning and games on networks. You'll also be introduced to Gephi, a software tool for network visualization and analysis. The 8th week is reserved for a final exam. Social and economic networks provides all the raw information you need to get a solid grounding in network theory and analysis, but the presentation style is impersonal so the content is not particularly engaging. The professor is knowledgeable and appears on screen while explaining lectur... Social and economic networks is an introductory network theory and analysis course geared toward learners who have are comfortable with basic statistics, probability and linear algebra. You don't need to know anything about social networks ahead of time to take this course, but having basic familiarity with networks will help things go a bit smoother. The course has 7 weeks of lecture content covering network basics, measures of centrality, network formation models and diffusion, learning and games on networks. You'll also be introduced to Gephi, a software tool for network visualization and analysis. The 8th week is reserved for a final exam. Social and economic networks provides all the raw information you need to get a solid grounding in network theory and analysis, but the presentation style is impersonal so the content is not particularly engaging. The professor is knowledgeable and appears on screen while explaining lecture slides, but he shows little emotion. While the lectures can get a bit intimidating with equation after equation, the homework exercises and final exam are easier than the lectures might suggest. You get 2 attempts on each chapter quiz and 1 attempt on the final; a score of 70% or more is required for a certificate and 90% or more will earn you a certificate with distinction. All in all, social and economic networks is worthwhile course if you are interested in social networks and aren't intimidated by a bit of math, but I wouldn't take it for fun. If you want to take a course on the same subject that is less mathy consider Coursera's Networked Life from UPenn.
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Richard Taylor profile image
Richard Taylor profile image
8/10 starsCompleted
  • 29 reviews
  • 28 completed
5 years ago
This is a very nice intermediate/advanced course on Social Networks. It discusses several topics that are usually not mentioned in other courses and the instructor is one of the most important figures in the area. There are some examples of applications of the topics seen. I would have liked some programming assignment or hands-on application to use the concepts and idea for some specific goal to make them least abstract. This is highly recommended to anyone interested in Social Networks and networks or graph theory in general.
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leonard mangini profile image
leonard mangini profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 39 reviews
  • 37 completed
5 years, 6 months ago
Excellent PhD level tour de force of network analysis blending theory, analysis, and practical problems. The optional companion text is a encyclopedic literature review crossing multiple disciplines such as game theory, risk and meme contagion, social groupings in high schools and tribal villages. Genuinely caring instructor and fantastically clear presentations.
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Njål Andersen profile image
Njål Andersen profile image
9/10 starsCompleted
  • 5 reviews
  • 5 completed
5 years, 7 months ago
Great course, covering advanced topics in the field. Use of free software allows one to further get hands on experience. Rather mathematically focused. Only suggestion would be more application.
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Jeff Winchell profile image
Jeff Winchell profile image
8/10 starsCompleted
  • 91 reviews
  • 66 completed
4 years, 10 months ago
I began my MOOCaholicism with his Game Theory class a year ago. The professor is clearly competent (further proof is found on his impressive curriculum vitae). I am beginning to wish I had not wasted my time in the Social Network Analysis class and just taken this class instead. While the professor's style is modest despite his impressive credentials, this also has the effect that he is not emotional enough, exciting enough to help students who aren't totally into the subject already. Minor item: Some of the explanations" in the in- video quizzes are not really explanations. They are just regurgitations of the question. When you get something wrong, the professor should know at least some common reasons why you might choose a particular wrong answer and pointing that out and why it is wrong is more educational rather than a simple. "You are wrong" type explanation. In many Coursera classes, there is not even a button "Explanation" gi... I began my MOOCaholicism with his Game Theory class a year ago. The professor is clearly competent (further proof is found on his impressive curriculum vitae). I am beginning to wish I had not wasted my time in the Social Network Analysis class and just taken this class instead. While the professor's style is modest despite his impressive credentials, this also has the effect that he is not emotional enough, exciting enough to help students who aren't totally into the subject already. Minor item: Some of the explanations" in the in- video quizzes are not really explanations. They are just regurgitations of the question. When you get something wrong, the professor should know at least some common reasons why you might choose a particular wrong answer and pointing that out and why it is wrong is more educational rather than a simple. "You are wrong" type explanation. In many Coursera classes, there is not even a button "Explanation" given in the in-video quizzes. It is preferable not to have this button, than to give useless explanations.
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Grigory Reznichenko profile image
Grigory Reznichenko profile image
7/10 starsTaking Now
  • 4 reviews
  • 0 completed
5 years, 10 months ago
The course is an advanced one. You should have quite good training in working with mathematical models, it's virtually a PhD level class - it's very scientific and research oriented. I barely find motivation to continue, since it's not very inspiring and engaging. Though some concepts are definitely useful for me.
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