Mechanical Behavior of Materials

Provided by:
9/10 stars
based on  1 review
Provided by:
Cost FREE
Start Date TBA

Course Details

Cost

FREE

Upcoming Schedule

  • TBA

Course Provider

edX online courses
Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Berkeley, are just some of the schools that you have at your fingertips with edX. Through massive open online courses (MOOCs) from the world's best universities, you can develop your knowledge in literature, math, history, food and nutrition, and more. These online classes are taught by highly-regarded experts in the field. If you take a class on computer science through Harvard, you may be tau...
Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Berkeley, are just some of the schools that you have at your fingertips with edX. Through massive open online courses (MOOCs) from the world's best universities, you can develop your knowledge in literature, math, history, food and nutrition, and more. These online classes are taught by highly-regarded experts in the field. If you take a class on computer science through Harvard, you may be taught by David J. Malan, a senior lecturer on computer science at Harvard University for the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. But there's not just one professor - you have access to the entire teaching staff, allowing you to receive feedback on assignments straight from the experts. Pursue a Verified Certificate to document your achievements and use your coursework for job and school applications, promotions, and more. EdX also works with top universities to conduct research, allowing them to learn more about learning. Using their findings, edX is able to provide students with the best and most effective courses, constantly enhancing the student experience.

Provider Subject Specialization
Sciences & Technology
Business & Management
24425 reviews

Course Description

*Note - This is an Archived course*


This subject provides an introduction to the mechanical behavior of materials, from both the continuum and atomistic points of view. At the continuum level, we learn how forces and displacements translate into stress and strain distributions within the material. At the atomistic level, we learn the mechanisms that control the mechanical properties of materials. We will consider: linear elasticity (recoverable deformation at small displacements), viscoelasticity (behavior intermediate to that of an elastic solid and that of a viscous fluid), plasticity (permanent deformation), creep in crystalline materials (time dependent behavior), brittle fracture (rapid crack propagation) and fatigue (failure due to repeated loading of a material). Examples are drawn from metals, ceramics, glasses, polymers, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials.


This is a past/archived course. At this time, ...

*Note - This is an Archived course*


This subject provides an introduction to the mechanical behavior of materials, from both the continuum and atomistic points of view. At the continuum level, we learn how forces and displacements translate into stress and strain distributions within the material. At the atomistic level, we learn the mechanisms that control the mechanical properties of materials. We will consider: linear elasticity (recoverable deformation at small displacements), viscoelasticity (behavior intermediate to that of an elastic solid and that of a viscous fluid), plasticity (permanent deformation), creep in crystalline materials (time dependent behavior), brittle fracture (rapid crack propagation) and fatigue (failure due to repeated loading of a material). Examples are drawn from metals, ceramics, glasses, polymers, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials.


This is a past/archived course. At this time, you can only explore this course in a self-paced fashion. Certain features of this course may not be active, but many people enjoy watching the videos and working with the materials. Make sure to check for reruns of this course.

Reviews 9/10 stars
1 Review for Mechanical Behavior of Materials

Ratings details

  • 5 stars
  • 4 stars
  • 3 stars
  • 2 stars
  • 1 stars
  • 5 stars
  • 4 stars
  • 3 stars
  • 2 stars
  • 1 stars
  • 5 stars
  • 4 stars
  • 3 stars
  • 2 stars
  • 1 stars

Rankings are based on a provider's overall CourseTalk score, which takes into account both average rating and number of ratings. Stars round to the nearest half.

Sort By
Steven Frank profile image
Steven Frank profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 59 reviews
  • 57 completed
6 years, 1 month ago
This wide-ranging introduction to the mechanical behavior of materials covers a lot of ground: stress/strain behavior at the bulk and atomic levels, principal stresses and transformations, beam bending, column buckling, the behavior of cellular and crystalline materials, creep and stress relaxation, brittle fracture, and fatigue. Prof. Gibson covers these varied topics at a brisk clip but at sufficient depth to provide a working knowledge of each subject. She frequently provides examples from the natural world, showing how animals and plants have developed sophisticated physical structures to resist or tolerate mechanical injury – for example, how woodpeckers avoid brain damage. There are 12 weekly problem sets and three noncumulative exams, each covering one-third of the course material. All of the exam problems are very reasonable and follow directly from the lectures and weekly example problems that Prof. Gibs... This wide-ranging introduction to the mechanical behavior of materials covers a lot of ground: stress/strain behavior at the bulk and atomic levels, principal stresses and transformations, beam bending, column buckling, the behavior of cellular and crystalline materials, creep and stress relaxation, brittle fracture, and fatigue. Prof. Gibson covers these varied topics at a brisk clip but at sufficient depth to provide a working knowledge of each subject. She frequently provides examples from the natural world, showing how animals and plants have developed sophisticated physical structures to resist or tolerate mechanical injury – for example, how woodpeckers avoid brain damage. There are 12 weekly problem sets and three noncumulative exams, each covering one-third of the course material. All of the exam problems are very reasonable and follow directly from the lectures and weekly example problems that Prof. Gibson solves for you. No textbook is necessary (although I found David Roylance's book, Mechanics of Materials, to be an excellent supplement -- it nicely covers all of the syllabus topics). The lectures themselves are clear and well-organized, having been recorded from the live class at MIT. My sole criticism relates to the amount of time spent writing on the blackboards – not just equations and graphs, but whole sentences and explanations. These might be better written out in advance or simply distributed beforehand, with the freed-up lecture time devoted to further elaboration of the very interesting topics.
Was this review helpful? Yes1
 Flag

Rating Details


  • 5 stars
  • 4 stars
  • 3 stars
  • 2 stars
  • 1 stars
  • 5 stars
  • 4 stars
  • 3 stars
  • 2 stars
  • 1 stars
  • 5 stars
  • 4 stars
  • 3 stars
  • 2 stars
  • 1 stars

Rankings are based on a provider's overall CourseTalk score, which takes into account both average rating and number of ratings. Stars round to the nearest half.