Computation Structures - Part 1: Digital Circuits

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Computation Structures - Part 1: Digital Circuits

Course Details

Cost

FREE

Upcoming Schedule

  • TBA

Course Provider

edX online courses
Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Berkeley, are just some of the schools that you have at your fingertips with edX. Through massive open online courses (MOOCs) from the world's best universities, you can develop your knowledge in literature, math, history, food and nutrition, and more. These online classes are taught by highly-regarded experts in the field. If you take a class on computer science through Harvard, you may be tau...
Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Berkeley, are just some of the schools that you have at your fingertips with edX. Through massive open online courses (MOOCs) from the world's best universities, you can develop your knowledge in literature, math, history, food and nutrition, and more. These online classes are taught by highly-regarded experts in the field. If you take a class on computer science through Harvard, you may be taught by David J. Malan, a senior lecturer on computer science at Harvard University for the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. But there's not just one professor - you have access to the entire teaching staff, allowing you to receive feedback on assignments straight from the experts. Pursue a Verified Certificate to document your achievements and use your coursework for job and school applications, promotions, and more. EdX also works with top universities to conduct research, allowing them to learn more about learning. Using their findings, edX is able to provide students with the best and most effective courses, constantly enhancing the student experience.

Provider Subject Specialization
Sciences & Technology
Business & Management
24425 reviews

Course Description

*Note - This is an Archived course*

Digital systems are at the heart of the information age in which we live, allowing us to store, communicate and manipulate information quickly and reliably. 6.004x is a bottom-up exploration of the abstractions, principles, and techniques used in the design of digital systems. If you have a rudimentary knowledge of electricity and some exposure to programming, roll up your sleeves, join in and design a computer system!
 
This is part 1 of 3, teaching the fundamentals of digital circuit design. Topics include digital encoding of information, principles of digital signaling; combinational and sequential logic, implementation in CMOS, useful canonical forms, synthesis; latency, throughput and pipelining.
 
Using your browser for design entry and simulation, you’ll get to design and debug circuits at both the transistor- and gate-level, culminating in the creation of a 3...

*Note - This is an Archived course*

Digital systems are at the heart of the information age in which we live, allowing us to store, communicate and manipulate information quickly and reliably. 6.004x is a bottom-up exploration of the abstractions, principles, and techniques used in the design of digital systems. If you have a rudimentary knowledge of electricity and some exposure to programming, roll up your sleeves, join in and design a computer system!
 
This is part 1 of 3, teaching the fundamentals of digital circuit design. Topics include digital encoding of information, principles of digital signaling; combinational and sequential logic, implementation in CMOS, useful canonical forms, synthesis; latency, throughput and pipelining.
 
Using your browser for design entry and simulation, you’ll get to design and debug circuits at both the transistor- and gate-level, culminating in the creation of a 32-bit arithmetic and logic unit. There’s also an optional design challenge where you can earn extra points towards your final score!


This is a past/archived course. At this time, you can only explore this course in a self-paced fashion. Certain features of this course may not be active, but many people enjoy watching the videos and working with the materials. Make sure to check for reruns of this course.

Reviews 9/10 stars
8 Reviews for Computation Structures - Part 1: Digital Circuits

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Rankings are based on a provider's overall CourseTalk score, which takes into account both average rating and number of ratings. Stars round to the nearest half.

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xyzabc 123333 profile image
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xyzabc 123333

10/10 starsTaking Now
6 years ago
The course is very good. It covers almost every topic in digital system. It gives every topic a deep insight. And it is easy to understand.Thank you very Much!
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Tarek Skeif profile image
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Tarek Skeif

10/10 starsCompleted
6 years, 4 months ago
I am already a BA degree holder of Mechatronics and I am used to handle out Digital design problems and achieving them in the real world, but 6.004.1x course have offered me a revolutionary way of thinking and manipulating Digital design problems and structures, giving new ideas and knowledge which I have not work with and always looked further to know about them. MIT courses are the best!
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Steven Frank profile image
Steven Frank profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 59 reviews
  • 57 completed
6 years, 3 months ago
MITx has divided the residential course called "Computation Structures" into three parts, and this is the first. It covers digital circuits, beginning with basic information concepts such as encoding schemes, entropy, and signaling. From there you move on to CMOS, combinational logic, sequential logic, and finite-state machines, and finally to the broader topics of performance measures and design tradeoffs. The course is introductory but, as with most MITx courses, often challenging. What would be taught in 4 or 5 weeks at MIT is spread out here into 8 weeks, with 2 units of material released every other week. That pacing is good and bad -- certainly it would be tough to get through all this material in so short a time, but I suspect most students found the hiatus between material releases a bit awkward. There are lectures, problem sets, graded homework assignments, fabulous labs (more on that below), and midterm and final ex... MITx has divided the residential course called "Computation Structures" into three parts, and this is the first. It covers digital circuits, beginning with basic information concepts such as encoding schemes, entropy, and signaling. From there you move on to CMOS, combinational logic, sequential logic, and finite-state machines, and finally to the broader topics of performance measures and design tradeoffs. The course is introductory but, as with most MITx courses, often challenging. What would be taught in 4 or 5 weeks at MIT is spread out here into 8 weeks, with 2 units of material released every other week. That pacing is good and bad -- certainly it would be tough to get through all this material in so short a time, but I suspect most students found the hiatus between material releases a bit awkward. There are lectures, problem sets, graded homework assignments, fabulous labs (more on that below), and midterm and final exams. The lectures, by Chris Terman, are engaging and clear; wry humor runs through the lectures and also the problem sets. Prof. Terman, however, is an off-stage presence. The course is run by ​Silvina Hanono Wachman, who delivers the tutorials, energetically answers questions on the discussion board, fixes whatever needs fixing, alleviates confusion, and does an amazing job at all of this. The labs are a highlight. Students build and test digital circuits using an online simulator, culminating in the design (with healthy guidance) and implementation of a 32-bit arithmetic logic unit. Another lab highlight is programming a Turing Machine simulation, which not only hones your skills with finite-state machines but offers a glimpse into the fundamentals of computability. The final exam was very challenging, with a single chance to answer each question, but also very fair based on the material covered. Overall this is a rigorous, well-organized, often exhilarating and occasionally entertaining introduction to digital logic and design.
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Ahmed Galal profile image
Ahmed Galal profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 1 review
  • 1 completed
6 years, 4 months ago
The content is very well, 6004 like no other digital design course in any university , the course is very comperessable ,it covers many subjects and books , MIT is the Top in Electrical Engineering & Computer Science in the world
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Liron Levi profile image
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Liron Levi

10/10 starsTaking Now
6 years, 6 months ago
The lectures & handouts combination is excellent! The problem sets and labs (using Jade) are simply awesome and very instructive. Thanks for offering this course!
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Student

10/10 starsTaking Now
6 years, 6 months ago
Eagerly looking forward to this course to revisit my fundamentals, useful for my higher studies :) Have previously taken and enjoyed MITx course..
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Student

6/10 starsTaking Now
6 years, 6 months ago
Rely excited for the beginning of the course
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Student

10/10 starsTaking Now
6 years, 6 months ago
reallyyy excited for the course! but yes as i have my exams soon i wish the course was a self paced one!
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