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Steven Frank profile image
Steven Frank profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 59 reviews
  • 57 completed
3 years, 6 months ago
Advanced Transport Phenomena picks up where the introductory course, The Basics of Transport Phenomena, leaves off, covering additional topics that are also treated in the optional (but excellent and reason... Advanced Transport Phenomena picks up where the introductory course, The Basics of Transport Phenomena, leaves off, covering additional topics that are also treated in the optional (but excellent and reasonably priced) textbook -- van den Akker & Mudde, "Transport Phenomena - The Art of Balancing." This course covers convection, radiation, laminar flow, and fluid momentum. What that means practically is that you'll study reactors, friction in pipes and Couette flow through channels, non-Newtonian fluids like mustard and whipped cream, humidity and the wet-bulb temperature, and viscosity. Like the first course, this one features problems that cover the material but are interesting in their own right -- computing the temperature of the Earth, modeling why deserts get so cold at night, making chocolate sprinkles, the aforementioned whipped cream, and painful intestinal gas(!). But this is not a mere extension of the intro course into additional topics. It is very tough -- note that word "advanced" in the title. Throughout this class you'll use "microbalances" over small system regions to generate a profile of how things change over space and time, and it can be quite challenging to figure out what quantities and regions to model. There are more equations and formulas than last time around, and again, the challenge is not so much in their number as how to choose and combine them. Figuring out how to think about a problem, and then puzzling through unexpected zigs and zags in the mechanics, can sometimes feel like a graduate-level enterprise. And of course you're expected to have fluency with all of the material you learned in the first course. Don't be put off, though. The lectures and tutorials are excellent, the staff is responsive and dedicated to students' success, and you'll learn quite a lot. The effort is more than repaid by the problem-solving toolkit you'll develop, in only six weeks, across a variety of important chemical engineering topics. Call me old fashioned, but when a man's wife asks him, "Honey, how big a square-profile conduit do we need to change the air in our kitchen three times an hour?" he should be able to respond, without hesitation, "What kind of interior conduit roughness are we talking?"
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