Introduction to Control System Design - A First Look

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9/10 stars
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Introduction to Control System Design - A First Look

Course Details

Cost

FREE

Upcoming Schedule

  • On demand

Course Provider

edX online courses
Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Berkeley, are just some of the schools that you have at your fingertips with edX. Through massive open online courses (MOOCs) from the world's best universities, you can develop your knowledge in literature, math, history, food and nutrition, and more. These online classes are taught by highly-regarded experts in the field. If you take a class on computer science through Harvard, you may be tau...
Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Berkeley, are just some of the schools that you have at your fingertips with edX. Through massive open online courses (MOOCs) from the world's best universities, you can develop your knowledge in literature, math, history, food and nutrition, and more. These online classes are taught by highly-regarded experts in the field. If you take a class on computer science through Harvard, you may be taught by David J. Malan, a senior lecturer on computer science at Harvard University for the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. But there's not just one professor - you have access to the entire teaching staff, allowing you to receive feedback on assignments straight from the experts. Pursue a Verified Certificate to document your achievements and use your coursework for job and school applications, promotions, and more. EdX also works with top universities to conduct research, allowing them to learn more about learning. Using their findings, edX is able to provide students with the best and most effective courses, constantly enhancing the student experience.

Provider Subject Specialization
Sciences & Technology
Business & Management
22043 reviews

Course Description

Have you wondered about the design strategies behind temperature controllers, quad-copters, or self-balancing scooters? Are you interested in robotics, and have heard of, or tried, “line-following" or “PID control” and want to understand more?

Feedback control is a remarkably pervasive engineering principle. Feedback control uses sensor data (e.g. brightness, temperature, or velocity) to adjust or correct actuation (e.g. steering angle, motor acceleration, or heater output), and you use it all the time, like when you steer a bicycle, catch a ball, or stand upright. But even though applications of feedback are very common, the subject is an uncommonly compelling example of mathematical theory guiding practical design. In this engineering course we will introduce you to the theory and practice of feedback control and provide a glimpse into this rich and beautiful subject.

Each week we will begin with a mathematical description of...

Have you wondered about the design strategies behind temperature controllers, quad-copters, or self-balancing scooters? Are you interested in robotics, and have heard of, or tried, “line-following" or “PID control” and want to understand more?

Feedback control is a remarkably pervasive engineering principle. Feedback control uses sensor data (e.g. brightness, temperature, or velocity) to adjust or correct actuation (e.g. steering angle, motor acceleration, or heater output), and you use it all the time, like when you steer a bicycle, catch a ball, or stand upright. But even though applications of feedback are very common, the subject is an uncommonly compelling example of mathematical theory guiding practical design. In this engineering course we will introduce you to the theory and practice of feedback control and provide a glimpse into this rich and beautiful subject.

Each week we will begin with a mathematical description of a fundamental feedback concept, combined with on-line exercises to test your understanding, and will finish with you designing, implementing, measuring, and analyzing a hardware system, that you build, for controlling a propeller-levitated-arm feedback system.

You will not need a background in calculus or software engineering to succeed in this class but you should be familiar with algebra and mechanical forces, have some exposure to complex numbers, and be comfortable with modifying mathematical formulas in short computer programs.

This is a lab course, and in order to complete the weekly assignments, you will need to purchase/acquire a list of parts. To make sure you receive your parts before the class begins, you should register promptly, so that you can access the lists of parts and international vendors.

Reviews 9/10 stars
4 Reviews for Introduction to Control System Design - A First Look

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Steven Frank profile image
Steven Frank profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 59 reviews
  • 57 completed
3 years, 2 months ago
I had the privilege of taking the beta version of this intense three-week introduction to control theory. It's a hands-on experience that covers the basics of control -- i.e., keeping a system operating at a desired setpoint using feedforward and feedback strategies. The course takes a discrete-time approach to avoid differential equations, but the math is still far from trivial, and discrete time is what today's digital controllers use. The first week builds the necessary mathematical foundation of sequences, difference equations and natural frequencies. The second and third weeks get into the meat of control theory, culminating with an exploration of Proportional plus Sum plus Delta (PSD) feedback, the discrete-time equivalent of the well-known Proportional plus Integral plus Derivative (PID) feedback paradigm. Students (reversibly) harvest a propeller arm from an inexpensive drone and combine it with an Arduino controller to ... I had the privilege of taking the beta version of this intense three-week introduction to control theory. It's a hands-on experience that covers the basics of control -- i.e., keeping a system operating at a desired setpoint using feedforward and feedback strategies. The course takes a discrete-time approach to avoid differential equations, but the math is still far from trivial, and discrete time is what today's digital controllers use. The first week builds the necessary mathematical foundation of sequences, difference equations and natural frequencies. The second and third weeks get into the meat of control theory, culminating with an exploration of Proportional plus Sum plus Delta (PSD) feedback, the discrete-time equivalent of the well-known Proportional plus Integral plus Derivative (PID) feedback paradigm. Students (reversibly) harvest a propeller arm from an inexpensive drone and combine it with an Arduino controller to create a programmable control system. A series of excellent user interfaces allows you to vary different control parameters and see the effects on the propeller -- does it hold steady, does it oscillate, or does it fly out of control? A terrific simulator ties the math directly to its control effects, allowing you to enter a difference equation and see how well controls an animated helicopter as it changes height. There were no lecture videos in the beta course, but the written materials were so good that I wonder whether lectures are even necessary, and the professors, Jacob White and Joe Steinmeyer, were incredibly dedicated -- fielding innumerable questions, fixing minor glitches, and taking a heroic interest in students' progress and understanding. It's amazing how much we covered in three weeks, though when it was over, many of us were eager for more -- and hopefully, down the road, there will be more.
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Danish Anwar profile image
Danish Anwar profile image

Danish Anwar

10/10 starsTaking Now
2 years, 9 months ago
Great stuff! Really help full in understanding control system theory in practice. Please launch full course series as soon as possible. Thanks
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Paul Triantafyllou profile image
Paul Triantafyllou profile image

Paul Triantafyllou

10/10 starsCompleted
3 years, 2 months ago
This course does a good job of balancing theory and application. If you're interested in control systems I would recommend this introductory course.
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Fernando Vizcarra Salva profile image
Fernando Vizcarra Salva profile image

Fernando Vizcarra Salva

10/10 starsDropped
3 years, 2 months ago
Me interesa el curso, leerlo ya que la información es esencial para la lógica de un drone. Quiero construir un drone, para medir radiaciones en lugares de difícil acceso en un reactor nuclear.
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