Just Money: Banking as if Society Mattered

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8/10 stars
based on  6 reviews
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Cost FREE
Start Date On demand

Course Details

Cost

FREE

Upcoming Schedule

  • On demand

Course Provider

edX online courses
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Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Berkeley, are just some of the schools that you have at your fingertips with edX. Through massive open online courses (MOOCs) from the world's best universities, you can develop your knowledge in literature, math, history, food and nutrition, and more. These online classes are taught by highly-regarded experts in the field. If you take a class on computer science through Harvard, you may be taught by David J. Malan, a senior lecturer on computer science at Harvard University for the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. But there's not just one professor - you have access to the entire teaching staff, allowing you to receive feedback on assignments straight from the experts. Pursue a Verified Certificate to document your achievements and use your coursework for job and school applications, promotions, and more. EdX also works with top universities to conduct research, allowing them to learn more about learning. Using their findings, edX is able to provide students with the best and most effective courses, constantly enhancing the student experience.

Provider Subject Specialization
Sciences & Technology
Business & Management
22042 reviews

Course Description

What do you know about banking? Do you know what your bank does with your money? The recent financial crisis highlighted some of the most fundamental issues with the mainstream banking system.

This course looks into banks that operate differently, namely, “just banks" that use capital and finance as a tool to address social and ecological challenges.

This course is for anyone who wants to understand the unique role banks play as intermediaries in our economy and how they can leverage that position to produce positive social, environmental, and economic change.

The instructors of this course have worked for over 10 years with just banks from around the world, as well as in the fields of community development, economic democracy, and social change.

No previous knowledge of finance or banking is needed to take this course.

Reviews 8/10 stars
6 Reviews for Just Money: Banking as if Society Mattered

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2/10 starsCompleted
1 year, 11 months ago
The voices from the people, who are working in just banks or related organizations/initiatives, have by far a better understanding of money than the two moderators/instructors. Sorry to say, but those explanations about money, its creation, why we need banks, etc. are poor with repeating mistakes in it and contradictory to the videos of the real experts on the matter. Probably the moderators should watch some videos of the course themselves, e.g. the one from Positive Money in week 3. The girl understood money creation. Or week 5, the interview with Brett Scott, speaking about the "quite shallow and naïve ideas" about how banking works (min 8:13). Moderators, who constantly repeat that banks provide a common good although it is easy to exclude people from access to financial services and the old, romantic imagination that banks only lend the money that was deposited previously by their clients, doesn’t take different explanations fro... The voices from the people, who are working in just banks or related organizations/initiatives, have by far a better understanding of money than the two moderators/instructors. Sorry to say, but those explanations about money, its creation, why we need banks, etc. are poor with repeating mistakes in it and contradictory to the videos of the real experts on the matter. Probably the moderators should watch some videos of the course themselves, e.g. the one from Positive Money in week 3. The girl understood money creation. Or week 5, the interview with Brett Scott, speaking about the "quite shallow and naïve ideas" about how banking works (min 8:13). Moderators, who constantly repeat that banks provide a common good although it is easy to exclude people from access to financial services and the old, romantic imagination that banks only lend the money that was deposited previously by their clients, doesn’t take different explanations from e.g. Bank of England or German Bundesbank into account, that have stated to explain some misperceptions in the money creation process. Let's assume, those two institutions know about the topic. An interesting statement of the moderators: Fractional reserve banking "means that banks take a fraction of the deposits they receive to lend it out. And in this process they create money." Hell. Are you serious about that? The reason why I give the lowest possible score to this course is because of the moderator quality/knowledge. The topic "Just Money" itself is great and there are some great examples that show that bankers can do good. Despite the poor moderator knowledge on the topic, I recommend the course because of the great examples "from the field", but don’t take the theoretical background/explanations of money as granted. Poor was also that I haven't received a reply to my email through the contact form of the presencing website and no comments from any responsible in the forum, when pointing out the weaknesses. The course itself is a pure "sit-in" course, so watching videos, (if desired reading some material), writing some thoughts to reflection questions down in the forum. All in all, not worth to buy the certificate.
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10/10 starsTaking Now
1 year, 11 months ago
Amazing course so far. amazing content. great explanations. I'm really liking it. i reccomend this course to everyone
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Kebede Tegegn profile image
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Kebede Tegegn

10/10 starsTaking Now
2 years ago
When I review this course as an Ex-Banker and as an Accountant, we'll learn more about the Social Accounting concept beyond adding/multiplying and subtracting/dividing in banking operations.
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Andrew Barker profile image
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Andrew Barker

10/10 starsCompleted
2 years, 1 month ago
I endorse this course fully! It opened up my eyes to how the financial system works and how it can be harnessed to create positive and lasting change in the world.
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10/10 starsTaking Now
2 years, 2 months ago
Good course
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Hjalmar Hernandez profile image
Hjalmar Hernandez profile image

Hjalmar Hernandez

6/10 starsTaking Now
2 years, 12 months ago
Pienso que sera de mucho provecho para dar al dinero su lugar en la sociedad. pienso que el dinero utilizado de forma prudente, transparente y equitativo puede cambiar de forma positiva la calidad de vida de nuestra sociedad
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Rankings are based on a provider's overall CourseTalk score, which takes into account both average rating and number of ratings. Stars round to the nearest half.