I "Heart" Stats: Learning to Love Statistics

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9/10 stars
based on  7 reviews
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Cost FREE
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Course Details

Cost

FREE

Upcoming Schedule

  • On demand

Course Provider

edX online courses
Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Berkeley, are just some of the schools that you have at your fingertips with edX. Through massive open online courses (MOOCs) from the world's best universities, you can develop your knowledge in literature, math, history, food and nutrition, and more. These online classes are taught by highly-regarded experts in the field. If you take a class on computer science through Harvard, you may be tau...
Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Berkeley, are just some of the schools that you have at your fingertips with edX. Through massive open online courses (MOOCs) from the world's best universities, you can develop your knowledge in literature, math, history, food and nutrition, and more. These online classes are taught by highly-regarded experts in the field. If you take a class on computer science through Harvard, you may be taught by David J. Malan, a senior lecturer on computer science at Harvard University for the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. But there's not just one professor - you have access to the entire teaching staff, allowing you to receive feedback on assignments straight from the experts. Pursue a Verified Certificate to document your achievements and use your coursework for job and school applications, promotions, and more. EdX also works with top universities to conduct research, allowing them to learn more about learning. Using their findings, edX is able to provide students with the best and most effective courses, constantly enhancing the student experience.

Provider Subject Specialization
Sciences & Technology
Business & Management
22559 reviews

Course Description

When you meet a new person, it is hard to know what to expect.  You may not be able to read the person or understand what they mean. Even if you want to have a good relationship with them, this lack of understanding can make interactions tense, unpredictable and scary! The same is true for a lot of people as they encounter statistics and mathematical ways of working with data.  Statistics can be confusing and opaque.  Symbols, Greek letters, very large and very small numbers, and how to interpret all of this can leave to feeling cold and disengaged—even fearful and resentful.

But in the modern information age, having a healthy relationship with statistics can make life a whole lot easier. We are constantly faced with an onslaught of data and claims about it—from news articles, to Facebook and blog posts, casual and professional conversations, reports at our workplace, advertising, and claims from politicians and pub...

When you meet a new person, it is hard to know what to expect.  You may not be able to read the person or understand what they mean. Even if you want to have a good relationship with them, this lack of understanding can make interactions tense, unpredictable and scary! The same is true for a lot of people as they encounter statistics and mathematical ways of working with data.  Statistics can be confusing and opaque.  Symbols, Greek letters, very large and very small numbers, and how to interpret all of this can leave to feeling cold and disengaged—even fearful and resentful.

But in the modern information age, having a healthy relationship with statistics can make life a whole lot easier. We are constantly faced with an onslaught of data and claims about it—from news articles, to Facebook and blog posts, casual and professional conversations, reports at our workplace, advertising, and claims from politicians and public officials. How can we process that information, make sense of it, evaluate truth claims, and put ourselves in a position to act on the information?  One of the most important ways is by befriending statistics and consistently using statistical ways of thinking.
 
The purpose of this course, then is to help you develop a functional, satisfying, and useful life-long relationship with statistics. To achieve that goal, we will take a non-technical approach—you will learn how statistics work and why they are so helpful in evaluating the world of information that is around us. You will learn about the logic of statistical thinking and the concepts (rather than the mathematical details and probability theory) that guide statistical inferences and conclusions.
 
You do not need to be a math whiz to take this course. If you can add, subtract, multiply, and divide (or just be able to use a calculator to do that!), you will be more than able to handle what will happen as this relationship develops.

By the end of the course you will be able to:

 

  • Identify the most important features of a data set
  • Select a statistical test based on the features of the data
  • Think like a statistical detective
  • Understand the relationship between two different characteristics or variables
  • Perform some simple statistical calculations and draw some conclusions from real data
  • Hopefully, love stats! 

We’ll do all of this using entertaining examples related to real-life situations we all encounter in everyday life.

Reviews 9/10 stars
7 Reviews for I "Heart" Stats: Learning to Love Statistics

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Brajesh Dhiman profile image
Brajesh Dhiman profile image

Brajesh Dhiman

10/10 starsTaking Now
3 years, 2 months ago
Super Ease of Learning. Concepts of elementary stats are told in a very simple and easy to do manner. Must Recommended course for basic stats. Thanks Prof Dan & Sara
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Student

8/10 starsCompleted
3 years, 4 months ago
This course has great content and presentation! It is recommended for people who needs to learn basic concepts in statistics.
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kenny liao profile image
kenny liao profile image

kenny liao

10/10 starsTaking Now
3 years, 8 months ago
The most comprehensive and practical and newbie friendly statistics course I have ever watched so far!
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Sang Venkatraman profile image
Sang Venkatraman profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 1 review
  • 1 completed
4 years, 4 months ago
Hands down the best introduction to statistics. The professor and his students that participated in the class were great. The course is extremely practical and at just the right pace. I learned more from this course than multiple attempts at other courses and self learning.
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Gayla Baker profile image
Gayla Baker profile image

Gayla Baker

10/10 starsCompleted
4 years, 5 months ago
I just read an earlier review that stated this course did not enable or encourage critical thinking, but - in my humble opinion - it did. If we accept that critical thinking allows us to apply logic and reasoning to new situations,this course did that by having a section within each stats test module where students created and shared their own scenarios, from their own lives, where a particular test could be utilized. I am an educator, and I frequently apply Bloom's Revised Taxonomy to my lesson planning. That hierarchy posits that creating is the highest level of thinking and subsumes within it the skills of remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, and evaluating. Creating new scenarios clearly calls on all those lower levels skills. For this to occur in a foundational/remedial/reparative level course is outstanding.
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Gayla Baker profile image
Gayla Baker profile image

Gayla Baker

10/10 starsCompleted
4 years, 5 months ago
I just completed this course and can say that for me it was an excellent experience. It offered basic information delivered in an easily understandable style by a professor who clearly enjoys and appreciates the subject matter. I had taken a grad level course previously and had progressed through it more confused week because it had been presented on-line in a too quick manner, with calculations required RIGHT THEN, when I was barely clear on what data to enter into the tables -- far too fast-paced for my plodding, step by step, linear learning style. This course,with the ability to reply videos, read the closed captioning, and to print and read the notes offered the pace and clarity that I needed.
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Simon Schilling profile image
Simon Schilling profile image

Simon Schilling

4/10 starsCompleted
4 years, 5 months ago
In the syllabus is written: "... The purpose of this course, then, is to help you develop a functional, satisfying, and useful relationship with statistics. To achieve that goal, we will ... learn how statistics work and why they are so helpful in evaluating the world of information around us. You will learn about the logic of statistical thinking and the concepts (rather than the mathematical details and probability theory) that guide statistical inferences and conclusions..." So I thought great, I will learn what is behind statistics without going into the details of all the maths. But instead of learning what is the idea behind the different methods, I just learned how to use the methods, by filling in my data into the provided formulas and getting a result, which tells me something about if my hypothesis is true or not. That's exactly what a lot, if not to say most, students are doing, using methods without really understanding... In the syllabus is written: "... The purpose of this course, then, is to help you develop a functional, satisfying, and useful relationship with statistics. To achieve that goal, we will ... learn how statistics work and why they are so helpful in evaluating the world of information around us. You will learn about the logic of statistical thinking and the concepts (rather than the mathematical details and probability theory) that guide statistical inferences and conclusions..." So I thought great, I will learn what is behind statistics without going into the details of all the maths. But instead of learning what is the idea behind the different methods, I just learned how to use the methods, by filling in my data into the provided formulas and getting a result, which tells me something about if my hypothesis is true or not. That's exactly what a lot, if not to say most, students are doing, using methods without really understanding what they are doing. This helps passing exams, but not to question results. Professor Dan Myers is a good teacher, it is fun following his videos, and in the beginning of the course he is actually explaining the concepts (e.g. the normal distribution) in easy words, so one can understand what is behind it. But as longer the course takes as more there is not much more than calculations, which is not only boring but does not help at all. There is software that can do the calculations for me. I only need to understand what the software is doing (what is influencing my result) and how to interpret the result. Critical thinking is not encouraged.
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