How to Code: Systematic Program Design - Part 1

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edX online courses
Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Berkeley, are just some of the schools that you have at your fingertips with edX. Through massive open online courses (MOOCs) from the world's best universities, you can develop your knowledge in literature, math, history, food and nutrition, and more. These online classes are taught by highly-regarded experts in the field. If you take a class on computer science through Harvard, you may be tau...
Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Berkeley, are just some of the schools that you have at your fingertips with edX. Through massive open online courses (MOOCs) from the world's best universities, you can develop your knowledge in literature, math, history, food and nutrition, and more. These online classes are taught by highly-regarded experts in the field. If you take a class on computer science through Harvard, you may be taught by David J. Malan, a senior lecturer on computer science at Harvard University for the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. But there's not just one professor - you have access to the entire teaching staff, allowing you to receive feedback on assignments straight from the experts. Pursue a Verified Certificate to document your achievements and use your coursework for job and school applications, promotions, and more. EdX also works with top universities to conduct research, allowing them to learn more about learning. Using their findings, edX is able to provide students with the best and most effective courses, constantly enhancing the student experience.

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22460 reviews

Course Description

This short series of programming courses are unique in focusing on learning a systematic programming method rather than a programming language. This practical approach will help you channel your creativity so that you can program well in any language.

SPD1 presents the core design method with a focus on simple data. You will learn techniques that help you develop your program requirements; how to produce programs with consistent structure that are easy to modify later; and how to make your programs more reliable by building tests as an integral part of the programming process. This part concludes with the design of simple interactive program. The final project is an interactive game.

This course is part of the How to Code - Systematic Program Design XSeries Program

Reviews 9/10 stars
54 Reviews for How to Code: Systematic Program Design - Part 1

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Jamie Bergen profile image
Jamie Bergen profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 1 review
  • 1 completed
6 years ago
This was the third MOOC I took through Coursera, and I thought it was excellent. I am new to programming, and I started this course immediately after completing Coursera's Introduction to Interactive Programming in Python (also an excellent course). One of my goals as a beginning programmer has been to learn good programming habits early. In the Python course, I noticed that I was able to get things to work after a lot of trial and error, but my code was far from elegant at times. This course gave me exactly what I was looking for - a systematic way to design programs. The course started with an introduction to Beginning Student Language and the DrRacket programming environment and quickly moved into the design recipes for functions, data, and interactive programs. A key concept that Prof. Kiczales emphasized is that the design of data drives the design of functions. At first, things seemed to move slowly and the design recipes seeme... This was the third MOOC I took through Coursera, and I thought it was excellent. I am new to programming, and I started this course immediately after completing Coursera's Introduction to Interactive Programming in Python (also an excellent course). One of my goals as a beginning programmer has been to learn good programming habits early. In the Python course, I noticed that I was able to get things to work after a lot of trial and error, but my code was far from elegant at times. This course gave me exactly what I was looking for - a systematic way to design programs. The course started with an introduction to Beginning Student Language and the DrRacket programming environment and quickly moved into the design recipes for functions, data, and interactive programs. A key concept that Prof. Kiczales emphasized is that the design of data drives the design of functions. At first, things seemed to move slowly and the design recipes seemed excessively elaborate for the simple functions that we were writing. However, as Prof. Kiczales promised, everything came together in the last few weeks when we learned how to apply the design recipes to increasingly complex problems, such as fractals and search problems. For me, the highlight of the course was in the last week when Prof. Kiczales began demonstrating how to write a brute-force Sudoku solver and I stopped the video and decided to write it on my own. It took me a while, but I followed the design recipes and broke the problem down into smaller and smaller pieces until I finally got it. I finished the course with increased confidence, knowing that I was developing the skills to be an effective programmer. A major reason this MOOC worked and was so successful is because Prof. Kiczales and the TAs put a lot of effort into it. It was obvious that Prof. Kiczales cared deeply about what he was teaching. He explained concepts very thoroughly and clearly and would often go through entire examples in detail. (While I appreciated this thoroughness, I did find it helpful at times to speed up the video.) In addition, he and the small army of TAs were consistently active in the forums helping to answer students' questions. There were some glitches, as this was the first offering of the course as a MOOC. Most notably, the quiz questions based on the homework were sometimes confusing and difficult to interpret. However, the efforts of Prof. Kiczales and the TAs to clarify any confusion and exclude the confusing questions from grading more than made up for that shortcoming. Overall, I would highly recommend this course to those interested in learning a systematic approach to programming, and I'm looking forward to the offering of Part II.
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Bunmi Ibikunle profile image
Bunmi Ibikunle profile image

Bunmi Ibikunle

10/10 starsTaking Now
7 months, 1 week ago
I graduated with a degree in computer science and technology 7 years ago but as a student in the kind of university i attended, it was all theoretical. Non of my lecturers delivered the basics of programming as the professor here took the course. He made programming something very enjoyable for me, something that tasks my brain to thinking logically and being able to tear apart and build up simple to complex solutions for everyday tasks that can be automated using a computer program. I can never be thankful enough for this great knowledge imparted in me. For anyone interested in understanding what programming entails form the onset, I recommend you take this course as it's invaluable and priceless to say the least!!!
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Guy Fellow profile image
Guy Fellow profile image

Guy Fellow

10/10 starsCompleted
2 years ago
I think this is a great class to take. I had never programmed before but I feel much more encouraged after taking just the first part of this class. I also tried out the famous CS50 class and while that is very nice as well the complexity and speed starting from lesson 5 on was a bit to much for me. This is much more systematic and easier to follow.
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Student

10/10 starsCompleted
2 years, 5 months ago
A excellent course which I recommend should anyone study before any specific programming language course. Explicit and articulated. Also provide valuable program problem solving approaches.
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Student

8/10 starsCompleted
2 years, 5 months ago
The knowledge acquired through this series of courses surely is useful. Unfortunately the entire course is taught on BSL/ISL/ASL, a language not used in any real-world application and that I'd be surprised you've seen it before. That's a sort of missed opportunity since other languages have all the necessary features like lambda, first-class functions, closures, or even more. Would this course have been taught through Javascript, for example, it could have been an absolute must. Said that, I'm pretty happy I followed all the three SPD courses, and I'm looking forward to learn even more on the subject with the incoming redesign of the entire path.
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Thanh Nguyen profile image
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Thanh Nguyen

10/10 starsCompleted
2 years, 6 months ago
I am a data scientist with a background on applied mathematics. Because I did not have an engineering background, I faced a lot of problems when I worked on large programming projects. I need desperately a course that teaches me how to code in complicated programs. I read various books on this subjects, including Clean Code by Robert C. Martin, or Head First Design Patterns: A Brain-Friendly Guide,... but I was not satisfied with what I got. This course really takes me to the next level and very useful for me. I think that this course is one of the most important engineering course I have ever taken. I will work on the second and third part of this course.
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student

1/10 starsDropped
2 years, 6 months ago
Don't bother. Test driven development, data structures, design patterns. For some reason they feel the need to invent new terms for these things or don't mention them at all. You are better off finding a book on these subjects using a relevant, commonly used language instead. Speaking about language. Their reasoning for picking Racket doesn't make any sense. They claim that if they picked an "industry standard" language like JavaScript they would upset people who wanted python. If they picked python they would upset people who wanted JavaScript and so on. Such people should be simply ignored since it's always useful to learn a commonly used language even if it's not your favorite. And if you already know one language it's almost trivial to learn another similar one. Especially basics that are needed for this course. Their solution for this problem however? Pick an obscure language no one wants. You can't open provided problem file... Don't bother. Test driven development, data structures, design patterns. For some reason they feel the need to invent new terms for these things or don't mention them at all. You are better off finding a book on these subjects using a relevant, commonly used language instead. Speaking about language. Their reasoning for picking Racket doesn't make any sense. They claim that if they picked an "industry standard" language like JavaScript they would upset people who wanted python. If they picked python they would upset people who wanted JavaScript and so on. Such people should be simply ignored since it's always useful to learn a commonly used language even if it's not your favorite. And if you already know one language it's almost trivial to learn another similar one. Especially basics that are needed for this course. Their solution for this problem however? Pick an obscure language no one wants. You can't open provided problem files in any other editor except DrRacket because of those stupid comment blocks. And that thing is not pleasant to use at all. So as I said don't bother.
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Student

10/10 starsCompleted
2 years, 7 months ago
I was skeptical at first with the language selection, but I went through the course anyway and I was amazed how great it was. I completed the whole series and you learn so much in this, functional programming, algorithms, different data structures and more. This biggest plus of this course is that you will make complex program and they will come so easy to you when you follow the systematic approach describe by prof. Gregor Kiczales.
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Student

10/10 starsCompleted
2 years, 7 months ago
I would highly recommend this course to either a beginner or somewhat experienced programmer. This course will not teach you any major programming language, but that is a benefit rather than a flaw. This course rather teaches you how to design functions and data structures through a very structured method, which can easily be applied to any other language you learn in the future. I would actually say that it is better that you learn how to think about function and data design, before focusing on syntax of any specific language.
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Tino Romero profile image
Tino Romero profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 1 review
  • 1 completed
2 years, 8 months ago
It's a great course and maybe one of the most important topics to master if you're a programmer (any level). This course will teach you how to design better, cleaner and faster programs.
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David Blackwell profile image
David Blackwell profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 2 reviews
  • 2 completed
2 years, 8 months ago
The Systematic Program Design courses provide a detailed introduction to computer programming and, as the name suggests, a systematic way of designing increasingly complex functions and programs. It is also an excellent introduction to functional programming, which is becoming increasingly important in professional software development. The course is very well structured and presented in a clear fashion, the exercises and programming tasks effectively reinforce the material covered in the lectures, and above all the course is a lot of fun to work through. Highly recommended.
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Abilio de Assis profile image
Abilio de Assis profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 1 review
  • 1 completed
2 years, 8 months ago
This course has raised my self-confidence in solving challenging problems. I finished my engineering studies in college more than 20 years ago. I worked with programming during my first five years after graduating. After that time, I began to get involved in bureaucratic tasks. I was feeling rusty and decided to take this course. What a pleasant surprise! Professor Gregor Kiczales is spectacular! The course is flawless. Early on, I came to the conclusion that I had chosen an excellent course to return to school after so many years. At the beginning of the course I was afraid of failing, because besides being away from programming for many years, I had the language issue. I had never taken a course in English. To my grateful happiness I was able to understand all the classes without needing subtitles. Professor Gregor Kiczales is very careful in explaining. Even simple problems are explained very slowly. Being simple allow... This course has raised my self-confidence in solving challenging problems. I finished my engineering studies in college more than 20 years ago. I worked with programming during my first five years after graduating. After that time, I began to get involved in bureaucratic tasks. I was feeling rusty and decided to take this course. What a pleasant surprise! Professor Gregor Kiczales is spectacular! The course is flawless. Early on, I came to the conclusion that I had chosen an excellent course to return to school after so many years. At the beginning of the course I was afraid of failing, because besides being away from programming for many years, I had the language issue. I had never taken a course in English. To my grateful happiness I was able to understand all the classes without needing subtitles. Professor Gregor Kiczales is very careful in explaining. Even simple problems are explained very slowly. Being simple allows the teacher to teach things I did not even know existed: to develop programs using a well-defined method. Now, after the course, I see that this method allows me to manage my anxiety of wanting to solve the problem immediately. And when I have my anxiety under control I can create higher quality solutions. Following the recipe, step-by-step, the problem is divided into smaller problems that are easier to resolve. These small successes implode the fear of failure and push us forward toward solution. Fear exists, because at the beginning the solution is not clear and I have doubts about my real ability to solve the problem. The solution needs to be built and then coded. The method taught in this course trains us through many exercises in these two stages. I was really proud of my final project: an Uber Simulation :-)
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Doug Lefelhocz profile image
Doug Lefelhocz profile image
10/10 starsTaking Now
  • 1 review
  • 0 completed
2 years, 9 months ago
I've never taken a computer science in a college setting. I have taken several introduction to programming courses including a few in Python, and one in Scratch which I completed or came very close to completing. I especially like how this course encourages you to develop your own project as the final part of the course. The design methodology also allows you to have some idea of what to do next and how to design a program so that it can get understood. It also helps to clarify as to why something didn't work. I would highly recommend this course to anyone who reads this. I only have the final project to complete.
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Student

10/10 starsCompleted
2 years, 9 months ago
Very interesting and helpful. the instructor is good, the content is good, and very well structured. not too fast, not too slow. It makes writing code a very enjoyable process. It feels amazing how even complicated problems could be broken down to small manageable pieces of programs to make us focus on only a particular specific problem at any point in time, eventually building the whole system for our amazement.
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Student

10/10 starsCompleted
2 years, 9 months ago
I've been approaching programming fairly informally for a number of years. I've worked with javascript, and I found my programming proceeded by trial and error. What I ended up with was fairly inelegant. What you get from this course is an approach which demands that you think of the right things from the start. Code gets tested from the beginning. The approach means that code works from the off, and it's easy to see and analyse the structure of what you've done. Highly recommended.
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Student

10/10 starsCompleted
2 years, 9 months ago
I learned so much! It might look boring at first, but what I learned in this course it's incredibly useful, when you have to design more complicated programs.
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Student

8/10 starsCompleted
2 years, 10 months ago
This course teaches you how to look at a problem and extract pertinent information from it which could then be used to code a solution for such problem, it also gives you a design framework that guides you all the way. The most useful part to me was that the technique and concepts taught- object oriented prog, unit testing e.t.c- are so central to programming in general that you could adapt them to other prog languages. Highly recommended. Thank you for sharing this.
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Student

10/10 starsCompleted
2 years, 10 months ago
Very interesting course, over the last couple of weeks, could really see how a structured approach can help in writing / editing programs / functions as the need changes using HtDD and HtDF recipes. Will surely take-up part 2 and 3 of this course.
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Alexander Koziol IV profile image
Alexander Koziol IV profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 1 review
  • 1 completed
2 years, 10 months ago
As a disclaimer, I've had moderate experience in scripting languages (Python, JavaScript, BASIC) before taking this course. Take the above then as a bad or good thing; this course was challenging and I learned a lot. Although Mr. Kiczales is sometimes slow - I watched all videos on 1.25 or 1.5 speed - his explanations are rich and concise. The examples used in the lessons effectively communicate the philosophy of design; students are encouraged to build whole programs with the instructor, which builds confidence in past material, and stop often to work ahead. As a whole, the course teaches students how to easily design complex programs step by step, using a series of design recipes which I find sometimes tedious but always important. As for the language, Racket is a bit idiosyncratic, as functional programming is fairly overtaken by the popular object oriented Java and Python, but it is very worth the headaches. But don't worry... As a disclaimer, I've had moderate experience in scripting languages (Python, JavaScript, BASIC) before taking this course. Take the above then as a bad or good thing; this course was challenging and I learned a lot. Although Mr. Kiczales is sometimes slow - I watched all videos on 1.25 or 1.5 speed - his explanations are rich and concise. The examples used in the lessons effectively communicate the philosophy of design; students are encouraged to build whole programs with the instructor, which builds confidence in past material, and stop often to work ahead. As a whole, the course teaches students how to easily design complex programs step by step, using a series of design recipes which I find sometimes tedious but always important. As for the language, Racket is a bit idiosyncratic, as functional programming is fairly overtaken by the popular object oriented Java and Python, but it is very worth the headaches. But don't worry, Clojure and Haskell are beginning to gain more influence in the market, so this is not a useless skill, and even without, implementing some aspects of functional design can't hurt. And despite the somewhat obfuscated manner in which some operations are performed, once learned, Racket makes for some beautifully concise and simple programs, especially once you get to the higher levels of abstraction and recursion. From what I've heard, object oriented languages are good for data type that are set to change, and functional ones for changing operations. Homework is divided into three parts; students are graded on lesson questions (multiple choice) and unit quizzes (in DrRacket), but I learned the most with the ungraded problem sets. Usually there are only one or two problems assigned, but more may be culled from the problem bank section on EdX for a greater challenge. Problem sets force you to use the design recipes in a calculated manner. As a warning, you must self-grade all unit quizzes, so prepare to be honest. I would recommend this course to anyone interested in programming, as well as those who have already begun but have trouble designing something useful. This course will teach you how to build some simple, but still complex programs. Expect about 8 hours of work per week to finish in a month. Of course, try to take the SPD2 and SPD3 as well!
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Student

10/10 starsCompleted
2 years, 10 months ago
The course is very well put together. I had already done The Little Schemer so conceptually it wasn't difficult for me, but I really appreciated the opportunity to put concepts of Scheme/Racket/Lisp into practice with the projects in the course. I will likely do Part 2 and Part 3.
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Student

10/10 starsTaking Now
3 years ago
If you want to learn how to program or to improve your programming skills, this course, together with Part 2 and 3, are for you. It provides systematic procedures to face the design of coded solutions.
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Student

10/10 starsCompleted
3 years ago
This course is the best thing happened me. I was thinking about finishing How To Design Programs but I saw this course. Instructor Gregor Kiczales is just awesome. I can now think, plan and write code in better way. What they offer is honest. We will learn how to code after this course. Now I say to people : "We should learn Systematic Program Design not Programming". Thanks!
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Student

10/10 starsCompleted
3 years ago
This course is the best thing happened me. I was thinking about finishing How To Design Programs but I saw this course. Instructor Gregor Kiczales is just awesome. I can now think, plan and write code in better way. What they offer is honest. We will learn how to code after this course. Now I say to people : "We should learn Systematic Program Design not Programming". Thanks!
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Daniel Bekhter profile image
Daniel Bekhter profile image
10/10 starsCompleted
  • 1 review
  • 1 completed
3 years ago
I absolutely loved this course. It gave me a system that I can use to solve complex problems using different programming languages, kept me engaged throughout the weeks, all the needed material was always at hand, I was guided through the learning process very deliberately and I even completed the whole thing in less time than expected. Overall, a superb course!
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Student

10/10 starsCompleted
3 years, 1 month ago
In my 30 years of programming and many college courses, I have never before seen such an elegant and systematic way to turn design into working code. It may seem tedious at first, but be patient and do the practice problems. Applying what you will learn in this course will give you an advantage over most people who claim to be programmers.
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10/10 starsCompleted
  • 4 reviews
  • 4 completed
3 years, 1 month ago
This is the first programming MOOC I have ever taken. Prior to taking it, I had attempted to read programming books with the intention of learning how code. It didn't take long before I realized that I hated reading books about programming. Not because the books I read were uninformative (though there are plenty that I could nominate as morbidly boring) but rather they lack the type of interaction to be found in a MOOC; which as a beginner is crucial because when you get stuck you need help from your peers. The main lesson to take away from this course certainly has to be systems thinking which is emphasized throughout by the professor. As I build up my programming experience with each day that passes, I am slowly beginning to appreciate the massive advantages it offers. Whenever I wrote a program that didn't do what was required, more often than not it was because of my adopting "verbal reasoning" as I punched in the code. As soo... This is the first programming MOOC I have ever taken. Prior to taking it, I had attempted to read programming books with the intention of learning how code. It didn't take long before I realized that I hated reading books about programming. Not because the books I read were uninformative (though there are plenty that I could nominate as morbidly boring) but rather they lack the type of interaction to be found in a MOOC; which as a beginner is crucial because when you get stuck you need help from your peers. The main lesson to take away from this course certainly has to be systems thinking which is emphasized throughout by the professor. As I build up my programming experience with each day that passes, I am slowly beginning to appreciate the massive advantages it offers. Whenever I wrote a program that didn't do what was required, more often than not it was because of my adopting "verbal reasoning" as I punched in the code. As soon as I started asking myself the "why" and "what" certain pieces of code in the program were doing, I quickly found where I'd veered off course. As a beginner, I did this course slower than most (just over a month) but I believe the extra time I spent on it will certainly pay dividends in the future. To sum up, I rate this MOOC very highly and look forward to completing SPD2 and SPD3.
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Student

10/10 starsTaking Now
3 years, 1 month ago
Excellent course on how to design programs. I have taken a number of programming courses and they all seemed to skip an essential step for getting from knowing the language to using it. This course provides that in the form of a framework that should translate to any language. The Beginning Student Language used in the course is simple enough that you can actually focus on the process rather than the intricacies of the language, which helps to reinforce the methods that make up the framework. I highly recommend this to any beginning or intermediate student, regardless of what languages you might be interested in. If you learn the methods taught in this course, you will have a much easier time using whatever language(s) you ultimately work with.
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10/10 starsCompleted
3 years, 1 month ago
I cannot speak highly enough about this excellent course. Prior to this I played with Scratch (block based coding) for a couple of hours total with no other coding experience. This course enabled me to write the code for animations and really explains the relationship between data and functions and emphasizes the importance of following a design method to simplify complex problems. This is a fantastic foundation upon which to learn to code. With these design principles in mind you will write cleaner programs that are easy to follow, understand and ultimately change. I think this course hold value for anyone who codes or wishes to; beginners and experienced coders alike. Thank you for this fantastic opportunity.
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10/10 starsCompleted
  • 1 review
  • 1 completed
3 years, 2 months ago
I did learn basics of C, C++ in a training institute, a while ago. It was an introduction to the syntax with simple examples. I always wanted to learn the systematic coding practice and to program world problems. By looking at the course name and checking the content, I signed up. Initially, at times, I was frustrated to learn BSL syntax, but the lectures, real-life examples (esp. animation) and the pedagogic step by step approach made it more interesting and I realized that I learned the OOP concept systematically. The problem bank is very nice and useful to consolidate the idea. I didn't involve in the discussion, but I received the quick replies for my questions. I am right now signing up for Part 2 and looking forward. I will engage in the discussions in Part 2. I strongly recommend this course, as the first step before embarking to programming languages. The title is very apt and the course delivers it. Thank you.
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8/10 starsCompleted
3 years, 3 months ago
The course uses BSL which I had never been exposed to, it takes very little time in teaching the language since it is an entry level language and focuses on systematic program design techniques right away. Although I would like to see the techniques applied to other programming languages this was a very instructive and useful course
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