The Quantum World

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7/10 stars
based on  3 reviews
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Course Details

Cost

FREE,
Add a Verified Certificate for $199

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  • In Session

Course Provider

edX online courses
Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Berkeley, are just some of the schools that you have at your fingertips with edX. Through massive open online courses (MOOCs) from the world's best universities, you can develop your knowledge in literature, math, history, food and nutrition, and more. These online classes are taught by highly-regarded experts in the field. If you take a class on computer science through Harvard, you may be tau...
Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Berkeley, are just some of the schools that you have at your fingertips with edX. Through massive open online courses (MOOCs) from the world's best universities, you can develop your knowledge in literature, math, history, food and nutrition, and more. These online classes are taught by highly-regarded experts in the field. If you take a class on computer science through Harvard, you may be taught by David J. Malan, a senior lecturer on computer science at Harvard University for the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. But there's not just one professor - you have access to the entire teaching staff, allowing you to receive feedback on assignments straight from the experts. Pursue a Verified Certificate to document your achievements and use your coursework for job and school applications, promotions, and more. EdX also works with top universities to conduct research, allowing them to learn more about learning. Using their findings, edX is able to provide students with the best and most effective courses, constantly enhancing the student experience.

Provider Subject Specialization
Sciences & Technology
Business & Management
22043 reviews

Course Description

Welcome to The Quantum World!

This course is an introduction to quantum chemistry: the application of quantum theory to atoms, molecules, and materials. You’ll learn about wavefunctions, probability, special notations, and approximations that make quantum mechanics easier to apply. You’ll also learn how to use Python to program quantum-mechanical models of atoms and molecules.

HarvardX has partnered with DataCamp to create assignments in Python that allow students to program directly in a browser-based interface. You will not need to download any special software, but an up-to-date browser is recommended.

This course has serious prerequisites. You will need to be comfortable with college-level chemistry and calculus. Some prior programming experience is also encouraged.

The Quantum World is ideal for:

  • Chemistry majors who want extra material alongside an on-campus course
  • Chemistry majors at an institution that doe...

Welcome to The Quantum World!

This course is an introduction to quantum chemistry: the application of quantum theory to atoms, molecules, and materials. You’ll learn about wavefunctions, probability, special notations, and approximations that make quantum mechanics easier to apply. You’ll also learn how to use Python to program quantum-mechanical models of atoms and molecules.

HarvardX has partnered with DataCamp to create assignments in Python that allow students to program directly in a browser-based interface. You will not need to download any special software, but an up-to-date browser is recommended.

This course has serious prerequisites. You will need to be comfortable with college-level chemistry and calculus. Some prior programming experience is also encouraged.

The Quantum World is ideal for:

  • Chemistry majors who want extra material alongside an on-campus course
  • Chemistry majors at an institution that does not offer quantum chemistry
  • Physics or CompSci majors who want to branch out to chemistry
  • Graduate students refreshing on quantum mechanics before their qualifying exams
  • Professional chemists who want to brush up on their skills
Reviews 7/10 stars
3 Reviews for The Quantum World

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Rankings are based on a provider's overall CourseTalk score, which takes into account both average rating and number of ratings. Stars round to the nearest half.

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Surachai Jodpimai profile image
Surachai Jodpimai profile image
8/10 starsCompleted
  • 2 reviews
  • 2 completed
1 year, 1 month ago
I completed this course last year. It's an exciting course. Python programming exercises at the end of each lesson will help me to visualize about real quantum world. However, this course is too long. It is very difficult to motivate myself to complete the course.
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student

10/10 starsCompleted
1 year, 4 months ago
The course is wealthy and challenging. Very comprehensive and intensive in the world of quantum physics and its application in spectroscopy. Python programming is also very nice for those who want to learn. I invite you to watch it again!
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Mark Weitzman profile image
Mark Weitzman profile image

Mark Weitzman

4/10 starsTaking Now
1 year, 8 months ago
For some reason the course contains numerous errors, almost all the notes (pencasts) for the course are in error. Additionally many of the multiple choice questions had no correct answers. I am a CTA for this apparently first run of the course, and spent numerous hours correcting errors in very basic physics. Event the background classical physics sometimes at the high school level are just wrong - never have I seen so many basic errors in a physics MOOC - and from Harvard no less, and in a course that has been taught for years - doesn't make sense. Additionally the python exercises are almost all undoable without reverse engineering, the use of DataCamp is a complete disaster, and will I suspect be discontinued in future versions of the course. Also the programming exercises are of a cookie cutter variety - do exactly as I tell you and you might get credit (which is not needed to pass the course fortunately) - there is no attem... For some reason the course contains numerous errors, almost all the notes (pencasts) for the course are in error. Additionally many of the multiple choice questions had no correct answers. I am a CTA for this apparently first run of the course, and spent numerous hours correcting errors in very basic physics. Event the background classical physics sometimes at the high school level are just wrong - never have I seen so many basic errors in a physics MOOC - and from Harvard no less, and in a course that has been taught for years - doesn't make sense. Additionally the python exercises are almost all undoable without reverse engineering, the use of DataCamp is a complete disaster, and will I suspect be discontinued in future versions of the course. Also the programming exercises are of a cookie cutter variety - do exactly as I tell you and you might get credit (which is not needed to pass the course fortunately) - there is no attempt to integrate the programming exercises with the learning in the course. So assuming for future versions of the course, all the errors are corrected, the programming exercises are revised or removed, would I change my recommendations? Not really, the course material especially for physics material is very uneven. They cover concepts that are relatively unimportant, derivation and solution of Kepler problem, solution of classical problem of electron spiraling into the nucleus due to radiation, meaning (done incorrectly) of self-adjoint differential operators, but fail to cover in any systemic way crucial aspects of quantum mechanics such as perturbation theory, radiation theory etc. Its just a hodgepodge of topics some interesting, some not, but most done incorrectly. The problems/exercises are poor (besides being incorrect) many are just plug and chug variety. So if you are really interested in learning quantum mechanics, take the MITx/EdX courses 8.04x, 8.05x where the instructors, problems etc. are top notch. If these are too difficult consider the Stanford QM courses.
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