Quantum Mechanics of Molecular Structures

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edX online courses
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Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Berkeley, are just some of the schools that you have at your fingertips with edX. Through massive open online courses (MOOCs) from the world's best universities, you can develop your knowledge in literature, math, history, food and nutrition, and more. These online classes are taught by highly-regarded experts in the field. If you take a class on computer science through Harvard, you may be taught by David J. Malan, a senior lecturer on computer science at Harvard University for the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. But there's not just one professor - you have access to the entire teaching staff, allowing you to receive feedback on assignments straight from the experts. Pursue a Verified Certificate to document your achievements and use your coursework for job and school applications, promotions, and more. EdX also works with top universities to conduct research, allowing them to learn more about learning. Using their findings, edX is able to provide students with the best and most effective courses, constantly enhancing the student experience.

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22043 reviews

Course Description

Knowing the geometrical structure of the molecules around us is one of the most important and fundamental issues in the field of chemistry. This course introduces the two primary methods used to determine the geometrical structure of molecules: molecular spectroscopy and gas electron diffraction.

In molecular spectroscopy, molecules are irradiated with light or electric waves to reveal rich information, including:

  • Motions of electrons within a molecule (Week 1),
  • Vibrational motions of the nuclei within a molecule (Week 2), and
  • Rotational motions of a molecule (Week 3).

In the gas electron diffraction method, molecules are irradiated with an accelerated electron beam. As the beam is scattered by the nuclei within the molecule, the scattered waves interfere with each other to generate a diffraction pattern. In week 4, we study the fundamental mechanism of electron scattering and how the resulting diffraction images re...

Knowing the geometrical structure of the molecules around us is one of the most important and fundamental issues in the field of chemistry. This course introduces the two primary methods used to determine the geometrical structure of molecules: molecular spectroscopy and gas electron diffraction.

In molecular spectroscopy, molecules are irradiated with light or electric waves to reveal rich information, including:

  • Motions of electrons within a molecule (Week 1),
  • Vibrational motions of the nuclei within a molecule (Week 2), and
  • Rotational motions of a molecule (Week 3).

In the gas electron diffraction method, molecules are irradiated with an accelerated electron beam. As the beam is scattered by the nuclei within the molecule, the scattered waves interfere with each other to generate a diffraction pattern. In week 4, we study the fundamental mechanism of electron scattering and how the resulting diffraction images reveal the geometrical structure of molecules.

By the end of the course, you will be able to understand molecular vibration plays an important role in determining the geometrical structure of molecules and gain a fuller understanding of molecular structure from the information obtained by the two methodologies.

 

FAQ

Do I need to buy a textbook?

No, you can learn the contents without any textbooks. However, if you hope to learn more on the subjects treated in this course, you are recommended to read the textbook introduced below:

Kaoru Yamanouchi, “Quantum Mechanics of Molecular Structures,” Springer-Verlag, 2012.

Reviews 7/10 stars
7 Reviews for Quantum Mechanics of Molecular Structures

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Danail Minchev profile image
Danail Minchev profile image

Danail Minchev

10/10 starsCompleted
2 years, 2 months ago
One of the best courses I have ever attended. Tutors are great, lectures are not hard at all. Everything throughout the course was just right. A joy to learn.
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Yasser Gomma profile image
Yasser Gomma profile image

Yasser Gomma

2/10 starsDropped
2 years, 4 months ago
very short videos, insufficient amount content taught(felt like it is a more of smooth propaganda for the book rather than being a true MOOC). it could has been an awesome course but the course team ruined it perfectly. so disappointed to see this course coming out from a prestigious university as Tokyo University.
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A Luceno profile image
A Luceno profile image

A Luceno

10/10 starsCompleted
2 years, 9 months ago
Utokyo003x provides very interesting examples of application of Quantum Mechanics to determine and explain shape, dimensions, and other properties of molecules. I think this course is a very nice complement to the much more theoretical but also very interesting courses provided by MITx under 8.05.1x,8.05.2x, and 8.05.3x. Utokyo003x is an intermediate course; some previous knowledge of Quantum Mechanics is almost necessary. The notation is often not explained, but it is standard in Quantum Mechanics (thus one should be able to recognize that h is Planck constant, c is the speed of light and so on).
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Ahmad Shan -I- Ilahee Chowdhury profile image
Ahmad Shan -I- Ilahee Chowdhury profile image

Ahmad Shan -I- Ilahee Chowdhury

8/10 starsCompleted
3 years ago
There are lots of things you need to consider when deciding which schools, and/or universities I want to apply to train with. These go beyond your subject preferences, the age group you guys want to teach, and the type of course.
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Kevin Kwan profile image
Kevin Kwan profile image

Kevin Kwan

2/10 starsCompleted
3 years, 2 months ago
For amateurs, the course failed to provide understandable teachings. For people with prior Chemistry and Physics knowledge, the course might not be needed at all. In both cases, what is the point of the course? # Failed to mention prerequisites The course syllabus or introduction did not mentioned the level or requirement in order to understand the course materials. The first week of the course seemed manageable. The everyday topics like global warming and colours were interesting. But the materials plunged to a difficult and abstract level when I ventured deeper into the course. I found the materials required at least university level of Chemistry, Physics and Pure Mathematics to understand. If you have no training of these subjects before, you would better skip this whole course. # Very limited guidance to after-video quizzes Nine out of ten quizzes, I yelled to the screen because I could not understand how the quizzes were rela... For amateurs, the course failed to provide understandable teachings. For people with prior Chemistry and Physics knowledge, the course might not be needed at all. In both cases, what is the point of the course? # Failed to mention prerequisites The course syllabus or introduction did not mentioned the level or requirement in order to understand the course materials. The first week of the course seemed manageable. The everyday topics like global warming and colours were interesting. But the materials plunged to a difficult and abstract level when I ventured deeper into the course. I found the materials required at least university level of Chemistry, Physics and Pure Mathematics to understand. If you have no training of these subjects before, you would better skip this whole course. # Very limited guidance to after-video quizzes Nine out of ten quizzes, I yelled to the screen because I could not understand how the quizzes were related to the videos. It was quite hopeless to find help in the discussion area. People who could answer the quizzes already understood the materials (again, why need this course then?), or they were with extremely high IQ. Could you please at least list out all the terms in the mathematical expressions in the videos and explain them? In the slides, they are all Greek alphabets. Suddenly in the questions, you ask about "vibrational frequencies", "force constant”, and other stuff. Hey, which is which? Could you please at least provide hints to the questions, for example, “please use the knowledge gained from lesson 2.4 and 2.6 to calculate…”? # No calculations examples were given in the slides So the videos were about deriving mathematical expressions. The first time you would see an example of how to apply those equation was when you click the “Show Answer” button AFTER answering the questions correctly. Oh wow. I mean, you only teach people who already knew how to get it correctly? # Too abstract Okay, so you talked about quantized level v0, v1, etc. And I finally guessed how to calculate the answers of the questions. But hey, could you at least tell me what is the meaning of the v0, v1, etc. in a way that is easier to understand? Like, tell me it is the energy needed for an electron to escape, rotate, or something. After these materials, I got a bunch of Greek alphabets, strange looking equations, and some calculus skills. What are their implications? What are the terms? How can I use them? To sum up, this course is more of an IQ test, math test, and a hide-and-seek game, rather than “Quantum Mechanics of Molecular Structures“.
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Claudio Felicioli profile image
Claudio Felicioli profile image
4/10 starsCompleted
  • 58 reviews
  • 58 completed
3 years, 4 months ago
Short introductory level quantum mechanics, with a focus on molecular identification. The content is very limited, with lots of omissions and simplifications. One of the problems is the instructor spoken English really hard to follow for a non-native without reading the transcripts.
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Renan Mendes Forta profile image
Renan Mendes Forta profile image

Renan Mendes Forta

9/10 starsCompleted
3 years, 7 months ago
Good course! 4 weeks is not much time, and the time effort is not that much, but the learning is awesome! :) Good structure, good explanations, the tests are a bit difficult and make you think a lot. For me, it was a hard course, but I really liked it.
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